Tibialis Posterior Rupture

Posterior Tibial Tendonitis

VIEW DETAILS

Recommended Exercise

VIEW EXERCISE DETAILS

Orthotic Device And Benefits

VIEW DETAILS

Related Device/Equipment

Orthomed Shoulder Brace

$ 280.00

Orthomed Shoulder Brace

$ 280.00

Orthomed Shoulder Brace

$ 280.00

Orthomed Shoulder Brace

$ 280.00

VIEW ALL PRODUCTS

Posterior Tibial Tendonitis

Foot

What is Tibialis Posterior Rupture?

Tibialis Posterior Rupture is a condition that occurs when the Tibialis Posterior muscle ruptures. The Tibialis Posterior muscle is located in the lower leg and helps to lift the foot up towards the shinbone.

The Tibialis Posterior muscle can rupture if someone does too many activities that require them to use their calf muscles. Activities like running, jumping rope, or dancing can cause this injury.

What are the types of Tibialis Posterior Rupture?

Tibialis Posterior Rupture is a condition in which the Tibialis Posterior muscle ruptures. Depending on how much of the muscle has ruptured, it can be classified into three types:

Total rupture

This occurs when the entire Tibialis Posterior muscle ruptures. The patient experiences pain and swelling in the lower leg that spreads to the ankle and foot. There may also be numbness or tingling sensations in these areas.

Partial rupture

This occurs when only part of the Tibialis Posterior muscle ruptures. The patient experiences pain and swelling in the lower leg that spreads to the ankle and foot as well as pain when walking or running on uneven surfaces or up stairs.

Complete rupture

This occurs when no part of the Tibialis Posterior muscle remains intact—it has completely separated from its attachment site on your tibia bone at your knee joint (femur). This type of injury requires surgery to fix it properly because there is no way for it to heal naturally after a complete separation like this one has occurred; otherwise, you’ll continue having problems with walking.

What are the causes of Tibialis Posterior Rupture?

There are several causes of Tibialis Posterior Rupture, and they include:

  • Trauma to the posterior tibial tendon. This can be caused by an acute injury or a chronic overuse injury.
  • Anatomical abnormalities such as an unusually short or long Achilles tendon or a small insertional tendinous intersection of the tibialis posterior tendon.
  • Posterior tibial tendonitis (also known as insertional Achilles tendinopathy). This is a condition in which there is inflammation around the insertion point on the back of your heel bone where the tendon attaches to it.

What are the symptoms of Tibialis Posterior Rupture?

Symptoms of Tibialis Posterior Rupture include:

  • Pain that worsens when you bend your foot downward and inward (dorsiflexion)
  • Pain that worsens when you pull your toes up toward your shin (plantar flexion)
  • Pain when walking or running on uneven surfaces, such as hills or stairs
  • Pain in the area where the tendon is damaged
  • Swelling
  • Weakness or inability to use your foot normally
  • Swelling and pain in the lower leg
  • Stiffness in the ankle and heel
  • Difficulty flexing (bending) the foot upward toward the shin
  • Pain that worsens with activity

What are the risk factors for Tibialis Posterior Rupture?

Risk factors for Tibialis Posterior Rupture include:

  • Age (those over age 40 are more likely to experience Tibialis Posterior Rupture)
  • Obesity (obese people have a higher risk of Tibialis Posterior Rupture)
  • Excessive stretching or straining on your feet, particularly while running or walking long distances (this can put undue pressure on your Tibialis Posterior muscles)
  • A family history of injuries or fractures: If your parents or siblings have had any kind of injury or fracture that involves their Tibialis Posterior muscle, you will also be at a higher risk of having this condition yourself

Recommended Exercise

Foot

What are the exercises for Tibialis Posterior Rupture?

When you have Tibialis Posterior Rupture, you need to be sure that you do your exercises regularly. The exercises will help strengthen the muscles around the knee and ankle, which will reduce pain and swelling.

The following exercises are recommended for people with Tibialis Posterior Rupture:

Prone hip extension

Lie on your stomach with your arms at your sides. Lift one leg off the ground at a time and hold for 10 seconds before lowering it to the floor. Repeat 10 times on each leg.

Side-lying leg lift

Lie on your side with one hand behind your head, and lift one straightened leg up towards the ceiling as high as possible without bending at the knee or hip joint. Hold for 5 seconds before lowering it back down to the floor. Repeat 10 times on each leg.

Towel stretch

Wrap a towel around your foot with both hands, then pull gently towards yourself until you feel tension in the lower part of your calf muscle (the area where it attaches to your shinbone). Hold for 20 seconds before releasing and repeating 3 times per day.

What are the treatments for Tibialis Posterior Rupture?

Tibialis Posterior Rupture is a condition in which the ligaments that hold your tibia in place are injured.

The treatments for Tibialis Posterior Rupture include:

  • Resting and icing the affected area.
  • Using crutches or a cane to reduce pressure on the affected area.
  • Consulting with a doctor about physical therapy and using orthotics.

Explanation of Recommended Orthotic Device

Back

What brace is used for Tibialis Posterior Rupture?

The lace-up ankle brace is the most common brace used for Tibialis Posterior Rupture. It is designed to provide support and stability to the ankle joint, while allowing full mobility and allowing you to continue your daily activities. Some of these braces are secured with laces or straps, while others have an elastic band that wraps around your leg.

A few of the advantages of using this type of brace include being able to adjust the compression level as needed, providing support for both mild and severe injuries, and being able to wear it for extended periods of time without discomfort or irritation.

Related Device/Equipment

Orthomed Shoulder Brace

$ 280.00

Orthomed Shoulder Brace

$ 280.00

Orthomed Shoulder Brace

$ 280.00

Orthomed Shoulder Brace

$ 280.00

Request Referral

Specialist Type:

Insurance Type:

Upload Referral Document:

Share

Send by: