Tibia Fracture

Tibia Fracture

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Tibia Fracture

Knee

What is Tibia Fracture?

Tibia fracture is a break or crack in the tibia (the big bone in your leg). It can happen when you fall, jump, or get hit by something. The tibia is one of the strongest bones in your body, so it takes a lot to break it. Most often, a broken tibia will heal with time and rest.

What are the types of Tibia Fracture?

There are different types of tibia fractures, including:

  • Open fractures, which happen when you break your leg bone and it’s exposed to outside air
  • Comminuted fractures, which are breaks that splinter the bone into many pieces
  • Compression fractures, which happen when your weight pushes down on a leg bone so hard that it causes the bone to break

Tibia fractures can be mild, moderate or severe depending on where they are located and how much damage they cause to the surrounding soft tissues and tendons.

Mild Tibia Fractures – In this case, there is no displacement or rotation of the fractured ends of the bones. The patient may experience pain and swelling but can bear weight without difficulty.

Moderate Tibia Fractures – In this case, there is some displacement or rotation at one end of the fracture, but not at both ends. The patient may experience pain and swelling but can bear weight with difficulty.

Severe Tibia Fractures – In this case, both ends of the fracture are displaced or rotated outward from their normal position. The patient will experience significant pain and swelling that makes it difficult for them to bear weight without assistance from crutches or a wheelchair.

How to diagnose Tibia Fracture?

Tibia fractures are the most common type of broken leg. It is caused by a direct impact on the tibia, which is usually accompanied by an ankle fracture. Tibia fractures are usually associated with other injuries, such as a dislocated knee or a torn ligament.

The diagnosis of tibia fracture is based on radiography and physical examination. The radiograph shows a defect in the bone that can be seen even without special equipment. In addition, often there is bruising around the area.

In some cases, the doctor may order additional tests such as X-ray of the skull, CT scan or MRI scan. These tests help determine whether there are other injuries in addition to tibia fractures.

What are the symptoms of Tibia Fracture?

The symptoms of tibia fracture include:

  • Pain in the shinbone
  • Swelling and bruising around the fractured area
  • The skin around the fractured area turning pale or blueish in color due to lack of blood supply
  • You may experience difficulty walking, as well as pain while walking

What are the causes of Tibia Fracture?

A Tibia Fracture can be caused by any force that puts the bone under stress, including:

  • A fall from a great height (such as from a ladder or roof)
  • A direct impact from an object (like being hit by a car)
  • A sports injury (like during football or soccer)

What are the risk factors for Tibia Fracture?

The risk of tibia fractures is higher in people who have osteoporosis or other bone diseases.

Other Risk factors for Tibia fracture include:

Age – The older you are, the more likely you are to have a Tibia fracture. This is because your bones become weaker as you get older.

Other medical conditions – If you have diabetes or heart disease, your risk of having a Tibia fracture increases.

Low bone density – People who don’t eat enough calcium or vitamin D are at higher risk for fractures.

High impact activities – If you play sports that involve high-impact activity such as running, dancing or tennis, your risk goes up even further!

Recommended Exercise

Knee

What are the exercises for Tibia Fracture?

In the case of a Tibia Fracture, the goal is to get you back on your feet as soon as possible. The following exercises are designed to increase circulation and improve flexibility while also strengthening the muscles around your injury.

Squats

Squats are a great way to strengthen your legs and get them moving again after your injury. They help you build muscle and increase circulation in your lower body.

Stand with your feet hip-width apart and your toes pointing forward. Bend at the knee until your thigh is parallel to the floor then slowly return to standing. Perform 10 repetitions, twice daily for three weeks.

Calf Raises

Calf raises are a great exercise for strengthening the muscles in your calves, which can help you gain stability and balance while you’re recovering from the fracture.

Stand with your feet hip-width apart, toes pointing forward and knees slightly bent. Lift both heels off of the floor as high as possible without letting your toes come off of the ground, then slowly lower back down. Perform 10 repetitions twice a day for three weeks.

Bridges

Bridges help you stretch out your back and hips, which can help relieve some of the pain associated with Tibia Fracture. It’s important to stretch regularly so that you can avoid developing other problems as time goes on.

Lie on your back with knees bent and feet flat on the floor about hip-width apart (the closer together they are, the more challenging this exercise will be). Raise hips into a straight line with chest so that only shoulders and feet remain in contact with floor (that’s it!). Hold for 5 seconds then slowly lower back down to starting position; repeat 10 times twice daily for three weeks or until pain decreases by 50%.

Leg Raises

Leg raises will help strengthen the muscles in your upper thighs and pelvis area, which will help improve posture and mobility after this injury has healed up!

These are a great way to build up strength in your lower leg. You can do them on the ground or in a chair. For more resistance, hold weights in your hands as you raise up and down.

What are the treatments for Tibia Fracture?

There are many different treatments for Tibia Fracture, including surgery, casting and physical therapy.

Surgery is typically used to treat Tibia Fracture when the break is severe or if other serious injuries have occurred at the same time as the injury.

Casting is another treatment option for Tibia Fracture. A cast can be made out of plaster or fiberglass and will immobilize your leg so it can heal properly.

Physical therapy is also an effective treatment option for Tibia Fracture because it helps improve strength and flexibility in your leg muscles so you’re less likely to suffer from future injuries such as this one again down the road!

Explanation of Recommended Orthotic Device

Knee

What brace is used for Tibia Fracture?

Tibia Fracture is a type of bone fracture that occurs when the tibia bone in your lower leg is fractured.

A below-the-knee brace is used to stabilize and support the injured limb while it heals. The brace also allows you to walk comfortably while maintaining the proper alignment of your leg.

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