Thoracolumbar Scoliosis

Thoracolumbar Scoliosis

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Recommended Exercise

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Orthotic Device And Benefits

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Thoracolumbar Scoliosis

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What is Thoraco-Lumbar Scoliosis?

Thoraco-lumbar scoliosis (TLS) is a form of spine curvature that affects the thoracic and lumbar regions of the spine. It is caused by an abnormal curve in these areas, which can lead to problems with balance, breathing and circulation.

In fact, thoraco-lumbar scoliosis (TLS) actually refers to any curvature in your spine between your thoracic vertebrae and lumbar spine. This means that TLS can affect any part of your torso, from your chest to your hips.

What are the types of Thoraco-Lumbar Scoliosis?

The three types of Thoraco-Lumbar Scoliosis are:

1) Congenital scoliosis, which occurs before the age of 10 and is often seen in children who have cerebral palsy, rheumatoid arthritis, or other neuromuscular disorders.

2) Juvenile onset scoliosis (JOS), which occurs during puberty and is often associated with hormonal changes.

3) Adult onset scoliosis (AOS), which occurs after puberty.

What are the symptoms of Thoraco-Lumbar Scoliosis?

Thoraco-Lumbar Scoliosis is a spinal deformity that can be diagnosed by looking at the shape of your spine. There are different types of scoliosis, and Thoraco-Lumbar Scoliosis is one of the most common types.

Symptoms include:

  • pain in the back and/or neck, especially when you wake up in the morning
  • pain when you are bending or twisting your upper body
  • a “C” shaped curve to your spine (when viewed from behind)

What are the causes of Thoraco-Lumbar Scoliosis?

The most common cause of Thoraco-Lumbar Scoliosis is muscle imbalance. Your back muscles become overdeveloped on one side because you use them more than you use your stomach muscles, for example. This causes your spine to curve to that side as a way to keep balance between the two sides of your body.

Other causes include:

  • Congenital scoliosis, which means you were born with it
  • Spondylolisthesis (a condition where one vertebra slips forward over another), which causes a sideways curve at L5 or S1
  • Injury from sports such as gymnastics, ballet, or soccer; or from falls or car accidents

What are the risk factors for Thoraco-Lumbar Scoliosis?

The risk factors for Thoraco-Lumbar Scoliosis include:

  • A family history of scoliosis
  • Congenital conditions, such as spina bifida
  • A personal history of a serious injury to the spine, such as a fracture or dislocation
  • Fractures in the thoracic or lumbar regions of the spine
  • Cervical or lumbar spinal stenosis

How to prevent Thoraco-Lumbar Scoliosis?

There are some simple things you can do to prevent Thoraco-Lumbar Scoliosis.

1) Make sure you keep your back straight when sitting, standing and walking.

2) Do not slouch or lean forward while sitting

3) Avoid sleeping in a position that keeps your neck bent.

4) Maintain good posture when lifting heavy objects.

Recommended Exercise

Back

What are the exercises for Thoraco-Lumbar Scoliosis?

The exercises for Thoraco-Lumbar Scoliosis are: pelvic tilts, arm and leg raises.

Pelvic Tilts

Pelvic tilts are a good exercise to strengthen the muscles that support your spine and pelvis. They help keep the lumbar spine aligned and relieve pressure on the discs between vertebrae.

Lie on your back with your legs extended and arms at your sides. Squeeze your glutes (the muscles in the buttocks) and press your lower back into the floor. Hold for 5 seconds, relax for 5 seconds, then repeat 10 times.

Arm and Leg Raises

Arm and leg raises strengthen the abdominal muscles, which help stabilize your lower back.

Lift both legs off of the floor as high as you can without bending at the waist or raising your head off of the ground. Hold that position for 5 seconds before returning both legs back to their original position. Repeat 10 times.

What are the treatments for Thoraco-Lumbar Scoliosis?

The treatments for Thoraco-Lumbar Scoliosis can vary from person to person, depending on the severity of the curvature. In most cases, the curve is mild and does not need treatment.

However, if the curve is moderate or severe, treatment may be necessary. Treatment options include:

Bracing

This option is used when a child has a mild curve (25 degrees or less). The brace will straighten the spine while it grows in order to help prevent scoliosis from getting worse. The brace should be worn 23 hours per day for two years or until the spine stops growing.

Surgery

This option is used when a child has a moderate or severe curve (more than 25 degrees) that does not respond to bracing. Surgery aims to straighten the spine by removing part of it and fusing vertebrae together with metal rods and screws.

Explanation of Recommended Orthotic Device

Back

What brace is used for Thoraco-Lumbar Scoliosis?

The TLSO is a brace that is used for patients with thoraco-lumbar scoliosis.

The TLSO is a type of orthosis that provides support for the spine and helps prevent further spinal deformity. It is typically worn during the day, and may be worn at night as well.

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