Skier’s Thumb

Skier’s Thumb

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Recommended Exercise

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Orthotic Device And Benefits

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Skier’s Thumb

Hand

What is Skier’s Thumb?

Skier’s thumb is a sports injury that affects the ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) of the thumb metacarpophalangeal joint (MCPJ).

The UCL is one of several ligaments in the hand and wrist that help stabilize bones and joints. The UCL of the thumb MCPJ helps hold in place the two bones in your thumb (your first metacarpal and your distal phalanx).

If you’re a skier, it’s likely you know all about this injury. Skier’s thumb can result from falling on an outstretched hand while skiing or snowboarding, or from falling on an outstretched hand while playing other sports such as football or basketball. In some cases, it may result from a forceful slap on an outstretched hand.

What are the types of Skier’s Thumb?

There are three types of Skier’s Thumb:

  1. Avulsion, which is the most common type of Skier’s Thumb and occurs when a tendon or ligament is pulled away from its attachment to bone. This can cause pain in the thumb and make it difficult to move.
  2. Tendon rupture, when a tendon tears apart completely, causing pain and loss of motion in the thumb.
  3. Fracture-dislocation, when a joint moves past its normal range of motion, causing severe pain and possible damage to nerves or tendons that run through the joint.

What are the causes of Skier’s Thumb?

The most common cause of skier’s thumb is a fracture of the ulnar styloid process (the area on the top of your wrist). This is usually caused by hyperextension of the thumb, which happens when you hit something with your hand palm-down.

Other causes include:

  • A dislocation of the distal radioulnar joint resulting from traction forces applied to the wrist during an impact event such as falling onto an outstretched hand. A dislocation of the distal radioulnar joint dislocation can result in damage to structures within the joint including ligaments as well as structures within the forearm such as nerves and arteries.
  • A rupture of ligamentous attachments between bones within the wrist which can occur due to excessive force applied directly onto an outstretched wrist during a fall onto an outstretched hand (e.g., skiers falling on their hands while skiing downhill).

What are the symptoms of Skier’s Thumb?

The symptoms of Skier’s Thumb are:

  • Pain and swelling in the thumb (usually on top)
  • Tenderness to touch
  • Bruising or discoloration of the skin
  • Bursitis or inflammation of the bursa (a small fluid-filled sac that cushions tendons, ligaments, and joints)
  • Wrist pain and stiffness with movement

What are the risk factors for Skier’s Thumb?

Skier’s Thumb is a chronic condition that occurs when a skier falls and hyperextends their thumb. The skin on the back of the thumb becomes inflamed, and the joint is restricted in its motion.

There are a number of factors that can lead to Skier’s Thumb. Trauma causing hyperextension is one of them, and falls, especially while holding something in the hand such as a ski pole, are another common cause. Chronic instability may arise from repetitive injuries.

Recommended Exercise

Hand

What are the exercises for Skier’s Thumb?

If you’re suffering from Skier’s Thumb, you may be wondering how to go about healing and how to prevent it from happening again.

Here are some exercises that can help:

  1. Flex your thumb as much as possible. This will help to strengthen your thumb muscles and keep them flexible.
  2. Use a heating pad, ice pack, or warm bath to help relieve pain and swelling.
  3. Stretch your thumb by extending it outward while pushing down on the top of your wrist with your other hand. Hold this position for 15 seconds at a time, repeating three times per day until your pain subsides.

What are the treatments for Skier’s Thumb?

Treatments for Skier’s Thumb can range from simple pain management to surgery. -First, it’s important to identify the severity of the injury, which will help determine the best course of action.

  • In general, if you have a mild sprain, you can try the RICE method: rest, ice, compression, and elevation. Some people find that this helps them recover quickly enough that they don’t need to see a doctor or receive any further treatment. However, if your pain persists for more than a few days after your initial injury, or if you have difficulty moving your thumb as a result of the sprain (as opposed to just being sore), then we recommend seeking medical attention as soon as possible.
  • If you do decide to seek medical attention for your Skier’s Thumb injury but your doctor doesn’t prescribe any medications or other treatments for it, be sure to ask what they would recommend if they weren’t able to provide anything at all!

Explanation of Recommended Orthotic Device

Hand

What brace is used for Skier’s Thumb?

Many people with Skier’s Thumb are told to wear a thumb spica splint, which is a brace that keeps your thumb in place. However, these braces can be uncomfortable, and some people find them difficult to wear.

If you’re suffering from Skier’s Thumb and want to find a more comfortable option, consider trying Fix Comfort Thumb Brace! This brace is designed to provide protection while still being comfortable and easy-to-wear.

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