Rotatory Knee Instability

Rotatory Knee Instability

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Rotatory Knee Instability

Knee

What is Rotatory Knee Instability?

Rotatory knee instability is a complex three-dimensional motion that can involve pathology of the anteromedial cruciate ligament (ACL). It occurs when excessive rotation of the tibia in relation to the femur causes your knee to dislocate or slip out of place.

How does it occur?

Rotatory knee instability is a condition in which the tibia rotates abnormally in relation to the femur. This three-dimensional motion can be caused by pathology of the anteromedial capsule, which is a ring of tissue that surrounds and connects the femur to its surrounding ligaments. When this ring is damaged, it can cause excessive rotation of the tibia in relation to the femur.

What are the types of Rotatory Knee Instability?

There are four types of rotational instability:

Medial (inside) rotatory instability: This occurs when the kneecap shifts inward, causing pain and swelling on the inner part of your knee.

Lateral (outside) rotatory instability: This occurs when the kneecap shifts outward, causing pain and swelling on the outer part of your knee.

Posterior capsular laxity: This type of instability occurs when there is too much movement between the femur and patella (knee-cap). Symptoms include pain, swelling, and difficulty walking.

Anterior capsular laxity: This type of instability occurs when there is too much movement between the femur and tibia (shinbone). Symptoms include pain, swelling, and difficulty walking.

What are the causes of Rotatory Knee Instability?

The most common causes of rotatory knee instability are:

  • The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL)
  • The posterior cruciate ligament (PCL)
  • The medial collateral ligament (MCL)

Other causes includes:

Traumatic Injuries

These include ligament sprains, meniscus tears, ACL injuries, MCL injuries and PCL injuries.

Non-traumatic Injuries

These include arthritic degeneration of the joint surfaces as well as bony overgrowth in the joint.

  • Excessive use of the knee, such as running or jumping sports
  • Osteoarthritis (also called wear-and-tear arthritis) of the knee joint
  • A congenital deformity (an abnormal condition you’re born with) in which your ligaments are too short or too tight
  • A tear in the meniscus, which can be caused by trauma or repetitive stress injuries.
  • An injury to the collateral ligaments, which are structures that support and stabilize the knee joint.

What are the symptoms of Rotatory Knee Instability?

The most common symptom of rotatory knee instability is pain in the front of your knee. You might also experience swelling and stiffness around your kneecap (patella).

Other symptoms include:

  • Pain around or behind your kneecap (patellar tendonitis)
  • A popping sensation in your knee when it bends/straightens out
  • Knee giving out unexpectedly when walking/running/jumping
  • Tightness of the muscles around the patella (kneecap)
  • Inability to straighten your leg completely
  • Swelling in your knee
  • Knee pain when squatting or going downstairs
  • A feeling like the knee will buckle under you, but with no actual buckling

How to prevent Rotatory Knee Instability?

To prevent Rotatory knee instability, you should:

  • Avoid high-impact activities that involve a lot of twisting or rotating your knee. This includes running, jumping and landing, and playing sports like soccer and basketball.
  • Try to strengthen your quadriceps muscles by doing exercises like squats and lunges. This will help stabilize the knee joint so it doesn’t move around as much.
  • Don’t wear loose clothing around your knees. Loose pants can get caught in your shoe and cause an injury if you fall.
  • Wear supportive shoes that have shock absorbent soles when you go out on long walks or take part in sports activities where you might experience intense contact with your knees against hard surfaces such as concrete or asphalt (e.g., basketball).
  • Avoid sitting down for long periods of time by getting up frequently from the chair whenever possible throughout the day; try standing up while working at your desk instead.

Recommended Exercise

Knee

What are the treatments for Rotatory Knee Instability?

The treatment for rotatory knee instability depends on the severity of your injury.

  • If you have mild symptoms of this condition, you may only need to rest and apply ice packs to reduce inflammation.
  • If your symptoms are severe or persistent, you will likely need surgery to repair the damage caused by your injury.
  • Treatment options for rotatory knee instability includes:
  • Resting your leg to reduce inflammation and pain
  • Using ice packs to reduce swelling and inflammation
  • Taking anti-inflammatory medication such as ibuprofen or naproxen sodium to reduce pain and swelling
  • Elevating your leg above heart level when resting it to keep it as elevated as possible for several days after an injury or trauma

Physical therapy

Your physical therapist will teach you exercises that strengthen the muscles around your knee. He or she may also teach you how to stretch them properly so they don’t tighten up over time.

Bracing

A brace can help keep your knee stable while it heals from an injury or surgery. It may also help prevent future problems like arthritis if you’ve already had one or more surgeries on this joint because these surgeries often weaken bones over time as well as soft tissue such as tendons and ligaments around them; therefore, they require long term care such as braces.

Explanation of Recommended Orthotic Device

Knee

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