Postoperative Hallux Valgus

Postoperative Hallux Valgus

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Recommended Exercise

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Postoperative Hallux Valgus

Foot

What is Postoperative Hallux Valgus?

Postoperative Hallux Valgus is a condition that can occur after surgery on the big toe joint. The medical term for this condition is arthritis of the 1st MTP joint.

The big toe joint is called the 1st metatarsophalangeal (MTP) joint. This joint connects your toe bone to your foot bone. When you have postoperative hallux valgus, the big toe joint will have an abnormal shape that causes your big toe to point out sideways instead of straight ahead. This can be caused by an injury or arthritis.

Postoperative hallux valgus can cause pain and stiffness in your foot, especially when you try to walk or run. It may also cause other problems like swelling and inflammation around your big toe joint.

What is Hallux Valgus?

Hallux valgus is a condition that affects the big toe. It causes the big toe to turn inwards, and can lead to pain, swelling, and stiffness. Hallux valgus can be a result of genetics or poor foot alignment.

Hallux valgus can be corrected with surgery, but it’s important to get treatment as soon as you notice symptoms of this condition, because it gets worse over time.

What are the causes of Hallux Valgus?

The following are some of the most common causes of hallux valgus:

  • Genetically predisposed people are more likely to develop hallux valgus than those who do not have a family history of it. The genetic predisposition may be due to abnormal bone structure or muscle tone.
  • A traumatic injury may cause hallux valgus if it affects the soft tissues surrounding the joint. For example, an injury could cause you to fall on your foot and injure ligaments or tendons around your metatarsophalangeal joint.
  • Repetitive stress can also lead to hallux valgus because it puts excess pressure on your big toe joint over time which can weaken bones and ligaments around this area which may result in dislocation over time

What are the symptoms of Hallux Valgus?

The symptoms of Hallux Valgus can include:

  • Pain in the big toe joint, particularly first thing in the morning
  • Swelling around the joint area
  • Tenderness or discomfort on the underside of your foot around the big toe joint area

Rehabilitation after Hallux Valgus Surgery

Rehabilitation After Hallux Valgus Surgery

Once you’ve had your surgery, it’s important to follow your doctor’s instructions on how to care for your foot. This may include:

  • Keeping weight off the foot as much as possible (this means wearing a cast or air cast while you’re walking)
  • Walking with crutches or a walker as needed
  • Using ice packs on the affected area for 15 min every hour for the first day or two after surgery
  • Using prescription pain medication as needed

How To Manage Postoperative Hallux Varus?

After surgery, you may have to manage postoperative hallux valgus. This is a malalignment of your big toe, caused by the surgical procedure or by poor leg alignment. When the big toe points outwards instead of straight ahead, it can cause discomfort and pain in the foot, ankle, knee and hip.

There are many ways to manage this condition. If your doctor has recommended physical therapy for you, then you should follow their instructions carefully. However, there are also some things that you can do at home to help keep your foot aligned properly until your doctor recommends otherwise.

Here are some tips for managing postoperative hallux valgus:

1)  Wear shoes with good arch support and low heels

2)  Avoid shoes that make your foot pronate (roll inward) or supinate (roll outward)

3)  Exercise regularly with ankle weights or elastic bands on both ankles while standing up straight

4)  Use braces that have been approved by a medical professional

What are the complications of Postoperative Hallux Varus?

The complications of postoperative hallux varus can be very serious.

The first is that this condition can result in a loss of bone, which could lead to pain and infection.

The second is that the patient may have difficulty walking, as the foot will tend to turn inward. This complication may result in chronic pain and discomfort.

Thirdly, there is a possibility that the patient will develop arthritis, which is painful and debilitating.

Diet for Postoperative Hallux Varus

The best way to help your foot heal after a hallux valgus surgery is to eat healthy foods that are rich in nutrients. Here are some of the best foods for postoperative hallux valgus.

  1. Green leafy vegetables like spinach and kale are high in vitamin C and help boost your immune system.
  2. Eggs contain omega-3 fatty acids and protein, which help heal wounds and fight inflammation.
  3. Fish such as salmon contain omega-3 fatty acids which may reduce joint pain associated with hallux valgus by improving circulation in your feet.
  4. Nuts and seeds contain arginine, an amino acid that helps repair cartilage damage caused by arthritis or other conditions related to aging such as diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM2).

Physical Therapy after Hallux Valgus Surgery

Physical therapy is a critical part of the recovery process after hallux valgus surgery.

A physical therapist will work with you to improve your gait and balance while also helping you to reduce the risk of complications like recurrent dislocation, knee pain, and plantar fasciitis.

They will also help you to regain strength in your ankle and foot muscles so that you can walk normally again.

How long does it takes to recover from Hallux Valgus Surgery?

It takes about 2 weeks for most patients to be able to walk without a limp. At that time, you can also start putting weight on your foot. You should avoid putting any weight on the operated leg for at least 4 weeks after the surgery.

You’ll need to wear a surgical shoe or boot for at least 6 weeks after surgery. If you have an open wound, your doctor may want you to wear the boot for longer than 6 weeks. The boot will keep your toe straight and protect it from getting bumped or hit during this time of healing.

You should be able to drive after about 2 weeks, but if your doctor recommends otherwise, listen carefully! Driving while wearing a cast can be dangerous because it’s hard to see out of one eye while looking over your shoulder at traffic coming up behind you.

Recommended Exercise

Foot

What are the exercises for Postoperative Hallux Valgus?

After your postoperative hallux valgus surgery, you can start to ease back into exercising. It’s important to start slowly and work your way up to a full routine. Here are some exercises for postoperative hallux valgus that you can do 3 days after surgery:

Toe lifts

Stand on one foot and lift the other toe up to the top of your knee. Hold for a few seconds then put your foot down.

Toe bends

Bend your toes forward and backward 10 times each direction—making sure not to bend them too far so they hurt.

Toe pulls

Pull on each toe with both hands, keeping them straight as you pull them away from your body until they stretch out completely (but don’t cause pain).

Explanation of Recommended Orthotic Device

Back

What brace is used for Postoperative Hallux Valgus?

A Hallux valgus orthosis is a brace that can be used to treat postoperative hallux valgus. It’s designed to correct the alignment of your foot, and it should be worn for at least four months after surgery. The brace will help you maintain proper alignment and prevent any further damage to your bones or joints.

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