Posterior Tibial Tendonitis

Posterior Tibial Tendonitis

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Recommended Exercise

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Orthotic Device And Benefits

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Posterior Tibial Tendonitis

Foot

What is Posterior Tibial Tendonitis?

Posterior Tibial Tendonitis is the inflammation of the posterior tibial tendon. This tendon is located near the ankle and connects your calf muscles to your heel bone. The posterior tibial tendon helps you walk and run by acting as a shock absorber for your foot.

If you have Posterior Tibial Tendonitis, you may feel pain in the outside of your ankle and along your shinbone. You may also notice swelling and redness around this area. Pain may increase when you place weight on your foot or when you bend your ankle up toward your knee.

What are the types of Posterior Tibial Tendonitis?

There are two main types of Posterior Tibial Tendonitis:

-Posterior tibial tendon dysfunction, which is caused by overuse and is often seen in runners or other athletes who have been training for long periods of time. The pain occurs when running down hills or when walking downhill.

-Posterior tibial tendon rupture, which can occur suddenly and without warning. This type of Posterior Tibial Tendonitis usually affects people who are older than 40 years old, although it can also happen to young people.

What are the causes of Posterior Tibial Tendonitis?

Posterior Tibial Tendonitis (PTT) is one of the most common running injuries, which is caused by inflammation of the posterior tibial tendon.

The posterior tibial tendon runs along the inside of your ankle and connects your calf muscle to your heel bone. When this tendon becomes inflamed, it can cause pain along the inside of your ankle. The pain may increase when you run or walk uphill and decrease when you stand still or walk downhill.

Other causes include:

  • An increase in activity level (eg, running)
  • Muscle imbalance (tight calves)
  • A sudden increase in weight on your feet
  • Overpronation (foot rolls inward)
  • Wearing worn-out running shoes
  • Decreased flexibility in your Achilles tendon

What are the symptoms of Posterior Tibial Tendonitis?

The symptoms of Posterior Tibial Tendonitis include:

  • Pain in the outside of your ankle or lower leg
  • A sensation of weakness in the ankle or foot when walking, climbing stairs, or running
  • Swelling in your lower leg or foot
  • Pain in the back of the knee, particularly on stairs or when running
  • Pain at night when you are trying to sleep
  • Pain that gets worse with rest, but gets better if you move around or use your leg muscles

What are the risk factors for Posterior Tibial Tendonitis?

The risk factors for Posterior Tibial Tendonitis include:

  • Age (the condition usually affects people ages 30 to 50)
  • Being over-weight or obese (especially if you are carrying excess weight on your legs or feet)
  • Walking or running a lot (especially on hard surfaces)
  • Having poor foot mechanics (such as flat feet or high arches)

Recommended Exercise

Foot

What are the exercises for Posterior Tibial Tendonitis?

If you’re suffering from Posterior Tibial Tendonitis (PTT), the exercises below are going to be your best friends. The goal is to stretch out the tendon and help it return to normal function.

Calf wall stretch (knees bent)

Stand facing a wall with your legs straight, your heels about 10 inches from the wall, and your toes pointed forward. Lean forward until you feel tension in the back of your calf. Hold for 30 seconds.

Calf wall stretch (back knee straight)

Stand facing a wall with your legs straight, your heels about 10 inches from the wall, and your toes pointed forward. Bend one knee and place that foot on the floor behind you, keeping the other leg straight. Lean forward until you feel tension in the back of your calf. Hold for 30 seconds.

Hamstring wall stretch

Stand facing a wall with your feet together and toes pointed forward. Place one foot on top of another so they’re touching at their tips—like a ballet dancer’s split position—and lean into it until you feel tension in both hamstrings. Hold for 30 seconds each side!

What are the treatments for Posterior Tibial Tendonitis?

There are several treatments for Posterior Tibial Tendonitis.

  1. Resting the foot and using ice packs can help reduce swelling, which can help relieve pain.
  2. Physical therapy may also be recommended to help stretch the tendon and strengthen your muscles around the ankle area.
  3. Changing your walking style or shoes may also be helpful in reducing pain caused by Posterior Tibial Tendonitis.

Explanation of Recommended Orthotic Device

Back

What brace is used for Posterior Tibial Tendonitis?

Lace Up Ankle Brace for Posterior Tibial Tendonitis

If you’re suffering from posterior tibial tendonitis, a lace-up ankle brace may be the answer to your injury.

The ankle brace is designed to keep the Achilles tendon in place and reduce pain. This helps prevent further injury to the tendon and improves mobility.

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