Posterior Cruciate Ligament Sprain

Posterior Cruciate Ligament Sprain

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Posterior Cruciate Ligament Sprain

Knee

What is Posterior Cruciate Ligament Sprain?

Posterior Cruciate Ligament Sprain (PCL) is a tear or injury to the ligament that connects the back of the knee to the thighbone.

The PCL is one of four ligaments that surround the knee joint. It helps prevent sideways movement of your lower leg bone (femur) in relation to your thigh bone (femur). When you injure your PCL, it may cause pain, swelling and instability in your knee. Depending on how bad your injury is, you may need surgery to repair it.

What are the types of Posterior Cruciate Ligament Sprain?

There are 3 different types of Posterior Cruciate Ligament Sprain, but they all have the same symptoms.

  • The first type is a Grade I sprain, which means that the ligament is strained and not completely torn. This can be treated with rest, ice, and anti-inflammatory medications.
  • A grade II sprain is a more severe injury in which the ligament has partially torn but still holds a lot of stability for your knee joint. This can be treated with rest, ice, anti-inflammatory medications and physical therapy.
  • A grade III sprain is when the ligament has fully torn or detached from the bone and requires surgery to repair it.

What are the causes of Posterior Cruciate Ligament Sprain?

The most common cause of Posterior Cruciate Ligament Sprain is a blow to the outside of the knee, which can cause it to bend inwards and put pressure on the ligament. This can be caused by an impact from another player, a sudden change in direction or even running into something such as an object or a ball.

Posterior Cruciate Ligament Sprain can also be caused by:

  • A fall from a height
  • Tripping over an object or another person
  • Sudden twisting or turning movement of the knee

What are the symptoms of Posterior Cruciate Ligament Sprain?

The symptoms of Posterior Cruciate Ligament Sprain are:

  • A popping sound or feeling when the injury occurs
  • Pain in the knee joint and surrounding area
  • Swelling of the knee joint and surrounding area
  • Loss of ability to flex or straighten your leg
  • Knee swelling
  • Limping or instability of the knee

What are the risk factors for Posterior Cruciate Ligament Sprain?

The risk factors for Posterior Cruciate Ligament Sprain are:

  • Aging
  • Obesity
  • Poor flexibility
  • Osteoarthritis
  • Previous injuries to the knee
  • Shoes with poor cushioning
  • Playing sports that involve sudden stops and starts, such as basketball, soccer, and football
  • Having weak hip muscles or tight hamstrings

Recommended Exercise

Knee

What are the treatments for  Posterior Cruciate Ligament Sprain?

The treatment for Posterior Cruciate Ligament Sprain depends on the severity of the injury, but most cases can be treated effectively with conservative therapy.

Conservative treatment for Posterior Cruciate Ligament Sprain includes:

  • Resting the knee until symptoms subside.
  • Using crutches or a cane until symptoms subside and you regain your strength.
  • Using an elastic bandage to support your knee while walking and exercising.
  • Using ice packs to reduce swelling and pain.

If symptoms persist or worsen after two weeks of resting, you should see a doctor who specializes in treating sports injuries. They will likely recommend physical therapy in order to strengthen your muscles around the knee joint so they can better support your weight when walking or running.

In addition, they may prescribe anti-inflammatory medications such as ibuprofen or naproxen sodium (Aleve) which can reduce swelling as well as pain associated with this injury.

What are the exercises for Posterior Cruciate Ligament Sprain?

Posterior Cruciate Ligament sprains can be tricky to recover from, but there are some exercises that can help you get back on your feet.

Knee flexion with heel slide

This exercise helps strengthen the muscles in the back of your leg and ankle.

To do it, lie down on your stomach on a soft surface (like a carpet), keeping your knees bent at 90 degrees and your feet flat on the ground. Slowly slide one foot forward until your leg is straight, then slowly slide it back to where it started. Hold for 5 seconds and repeat 10 times in each direction.

Seated quad sets

This exercise focuses on strengthening the muscles in the front of your thigh (your quads). Sit with both feet flat and straight out in front of you as far apart as possible without causing any pain or discomfort (about as far apart as possible without causing any pain or discomfort). Hold for 30 seconds then switch sides and hold for 30 seconds again. Do this set three times each day for two weeks after an injury has occurred so that you can work on getting back into running shape!

Quad sets

This exercise focuses on stretching out your quadriceps muscles so that they don’t become too tight.

Lie on your back with legs straight up in the air and toes pointed toward the ceiling (or as much as possible). Bend one knee at a time so that it touches the opposite elbow while keeping both shoulders on the ground; this is one rep—do 10 per leg (20 total).

Explanation of Recommended Orthotic Device

Knee

What brace is used for Posterior Cruciate Ligament Sprain?

Hinged knee brace is used for Posterior Cruciate Ligament Sprain.

Posterior Cruciate Ligament Sprain is a type of knee injury that happens when the PCL (posterior cruciate ligament) tears or becomes stretched out. It can occur when your knee is bent and twisted, like during a football tackle.

A hinged knee brace can help stabilize the knee by preventing it from bending too far backward or sideways. They are often worn for about six weeks after treatment ends to help prevent further injury and pain.

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