Post-Surgery PIP-DIP

Post-Surgery PIP-DIP

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Recommended Exercise

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Orthotic Device And Benefits

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Post-Surgery PIP-DIP

Hand

What is Post-Surgery PIP-DIP?

Post-Surgery PIP-DIP is a common condition that affects the fingers and hands after surgery. You may also hear it called “surgical hand syndrome.”

Post-Surgery PIP-DIP causes swelling, pain, tingling, and numbness in your fingers. This can make simple tasks such as washing your hands or tying your shoes difficult or impossible. The symptoms usually get better within two months after surgery, but it can take longer for some people.

What are PIP and DIP Joints?

PIP and DIP joints are the joints between your finger bones, also known as phalanges.

PIP means proximal interphalangeal joint, which is the joint closest to your palm. The PIP joints are located at the tips of your fingers, just before they bend. These are the joints that get injured when you fall on your hand and dislocate or fracture them.

DIP means distal interphalangeal joint, which is the joint closest to your fingertip. These joints are located at the base of each finger and allow for greater flexibility than their counterparts do.

What is Post-Surgery PIP?

When you get a joint replaced (like your knee or hip), you may have heard of something called “Post-Surgery PIP”. This is a common problem that can occur after joint replacement surgery.

Post-Surgery PIP is when the ends of your finger bones rub together and cause pain and discomfort. This happens because the joint replacement will not allow for full movement in all directions. If this happens to you, your doctor may suggest using a splint for protection until the bone heals and forms around the new joint.

You may also need to take pain medications to help with discomfort until it goes away completely.

What is Post-Surgery DIP?

Post-Surgery Distal Interphalangeal (DIP) is a condition that affects the joints of your fingers and toes. The condition happens when the tendons that connect to your muscles become inflamed, causing pain and stiffness in your fingers and toes. It can also cause swelling in the affected area, which will make it difficult to move your fingers or toes.

If you have Post-Surgery Distal Interphalangeal (DIP), it’s important to take care of yourself so that you don’t get worse. Here are some ways to manage this condition:

Use ice packs on your hands and feet for 15 minutes at a time every two hours during the day, but avoid using them at night because it can keep you from sleeping well.

What are the benefits of Post-Surgery PIP-DIP?

Post-Surgery PIP-DIP is a way to help you recover from surgery. It can also help you maintain your range of motion, which will help speed up your recovery.

Post-Surgery PIP-DIP helps alleviate pain and swelling by increasing blood circulation in the area where you had surgery. It also increases flexibility in your joints, which helps with healing and recovery.

Post-Surgery PIP-DIP can be used for any part of your body that has been injured or undergone surgery, including the arms, and legs.

What are the complications of Post-Surgery PIP-DIP?

The complications of Post-Surgery PIP-DIP can vary widely depending on the patient’s individual experience with the condition. Some common complications include:

  • Infection
  • Bleeding
  • Numbness, tingling, or pain in the affected area

Many patients with Post-Surgery PIP-DIP will experience one or more of these complications. However, not all patients will have these problems.

Recommended Exercise

Hand

What are the exercises for Post-Surgery PIP-DIP?

When you’re recovering from surgery on your PIP-DIP joints, it’s important to do exercises that will help you strengthen and rebuild the muscles around your hands.

Full Finger Extension

Extend all fingers as far as possible in a straight line, then hold for 3 seconds. Repeat 10 times.

Tabletop Position

Place both hands on a flat surface with palms facing down, fingers spread as wide as they can go. Hold for 5 seconds, then release. Repeat 10 times.

Fist Position

Clench your fists tightly with index finger pointed upward, then release. Repeat 10 times.

Physical therapy for Post-Surgery PIP-DIP

Physical therapy for post-surgery PIP-DIP is a process that helps patients recover from their injuries and return to their normal activities. The physical therapist may also help prevent further injury with exercises and other treatments as needed.

Post-surgery PIP-DIP recovery can be difficult, but it’s important to follow your doctor’s instructions while you’re healing so you can avoid additional problems down the road. The first step in your recovery process is getting in touch with your physical therapist.

They’ll work with you on a plan of action that will help keep you on track with your goals and keep you comfortable during the healing process.

Explanation of Recommended Orthotic Device

Hand

What brace is used for Post-Surgery PIP-DIP?

For post-surgery PIP-DIP, you may be prescribed a finger splint. This is a small, lightweight brace that you can wear on your finger to help prevent your knuckle from bending too far back. It’s a good option for people who need to hold things or type while they recover from surgery.

You may also be prescribed a 3pp step up splint if the pain is more severe. This is a larger device that wraps around your wrist and hand. It provides more support than a finger splint and helps prevent you from bending your fingers back at all while they heal.

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