Post Fracture of Tibia

Post Fracture of Tibia

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Post Fracture of Tibia

Leg

What is the Post Fracture of Tibia?

A post fracture of the tibia is a break of the shin bone. The tibia is the long, thick bone in your lower leg. It connects to your knee, and then your foot.

A break may be caused by trauma or stress on the leg. This can occur from an accident or fall, or it can happen for no reason at all.

What is Tibia Bone?

The tibia is the larger and stronger of the two bones in the lower leg. It runs from below your knee to just above your ankle. The outer side of the bone is covered with dense, tough tissue called periosteum, which protects it from damage.

The tibia connects to your knee joint by means of a fibrous ligament called the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). In addition, there are two small muscles on either side of your shinbones that help you bend and straighten your feet.

What is the function of Tibia Bone?

Tibia bone is the largest bone in the lower leg and extends from the knee to the ankle. It is a strong, weight-bearing bone that provides support for the lower leg and foot.

The tibia supports forces that come from below, such as when walking up stairs or jumping.

Tibia bone also helps stabilize the knee joint by preventing the shinbone from bending too far inward when you press your toes against a wall while standing on one foot.

What is Tibia Fracture?

Tibia fracture is a break in the tibia, or shinbone. The tibia is the larger of the two bones in your lower leg. A fracture of the tibia can be a result of trauma to the leg, such as a fall or motor vehicle accident.

Fractures of the tibia are classified by their location and severity. Fractures can be either open, meaning there is an external wound, or closed, which means there is no external wound.

What are the types of Tibia Fracture?

The most common types of Tibia Fracture are:

  1. Simple closed fracture – in this type of fracture, only one bone is broken and there are no other injuries such as torn ligaments or damaged nerves.
  2. Open fracture – this type of fracture involves multiple breaks in one or more bones and can also cause damage to nearby soft tissues such as muscles and tendons.
  3. Comminuted fracture – this type of fracture occurs when a bone breaks into several pieces, making it difficult to treat effectively because each piece must be stabilized individually before surgery can begin on any other part of the injury site.

How long does tibia fracture take to heal?

Tibia fractures are common and can vary in severity. The recovery process for a broken tibia can take anywhere from two months to three months, depending on the severity of the injury. In some cases, your doctor may recommend physical therapy to help you regain strength in your leg and maintain mobility while you heal.

The healing process for a tibia fracture depends on several factors:

  • The severity of the fracture
  • Whether or not it’s a simple or compound fracture
  • Whether or not surgery was done to repair the fracture
  • Your age and overall health

What are the long term effects of a broken tibia?

The long-term effects of a broken tibia can be widely varied, depending on the severity of the break.

The most common long-term effects are pain and stiffness in the leg, which is likely to cause a limp if you try to walk on it. You might also experience difficulty with balance and coordination, which can make existing activities like running or playing sports difficult.

In some cases, the bone fracture may heal improperly, resulting in an abnormal angle between your shinbone and calf bone when you stand up straight. This can cause additional pain and difficulty walking or standing still for long periods of time.

How do you strengthen your legs after a broken tibia?

After a tibia fracture, your doctor will prescribe physical therapy. This helps you regain strength and flexibility in your leg muscles and will help you avoid problems like osteoporosis later in life.

The best way to strengthen your legs after a broken tibia is with exercises that focus on the lower leg muscles. Leg extensions, calf raises, and toe raises are good choices for this. You can do these exercises at home or at the gym.

Your doctor may also recommend that you use crutches or a cane for support while walking until your bones heal completely. While using these devices, keep in mind that they are only meant to support some of your weight—not all of it!

Recommended Exercise

Leg

What are the exercises for Post Fracture of Tibia?

The first thing that you should do after breaking your tibia is rest for two weeks before beginning any exercise. This will give your body time to heal so that it can handle the stress of physical therapy. After two weeks, begin doing these exercises every day:

Leg extension

Lie down on your back with one leg bent at 90 degrees and the other straight out in front of you. Lift up both legs until they are parallel with the floor and then lower them back down again slowly (1 set). Repeat this 3 times per week for 4 weeks until healed completely.

Leg flexion

Lie down on your back with one leg bent at 90 degrees while keeping the other straight out in front of you. Lift up both legs until they are parallel with the floor and then lower them back down again slowly (1 set). Repeat this 3 times per week for 4 weeks until healed.

Hip Flexion

Lie on your back, with your knees bent and feet flat on the floor. Lift your hips off the floor until they are at a 90-degree angle with your thighs, hold for a few seconds, then lower them back down to the ground. Repeat 10 times.

Quadriceps Stretch

Kneel on all fours with both hands under your shoulders and knees under your hips (this is called tabletop position). Keep your back straight and look forward as you bend one knee toward the floor until you feel a stretch in the front of that thigh; keep this position for 30 seconds before switching sides and repeating on the other leg.

Leg Raises

Lie on your back, with your knees bent and feet flat on the floor. Lift your legs off the floor, hold for a few seconds, and then lower them to the ground. Repeat 10 times.

How to take care of Post Fracture of Tibia?

After you have fractured your tibia, it is important to take care of it. Here are some tips on how to do that:

  • Keep your legs elevated as much as possible. This will reduce the swelling and help the bone heal faster.
  • Use an ice pack for 10 minutes every hour (or more often if needed). You can also use a cold compress or bag of frozen vegetables wrapped in a towel.
  • Take pain medicine as needed to make sure you feel comfortable while you heal.
  • Do not put any weight on your leg until it has healed completely (about 6 weeks).

Explanation of Recommended Orthotic Device

Leg

What brace is used for the Post Fracture of Tibia?

Tibial Fracture Brace

A post fracture of the tibia is a major injury. It can affect your ability to walk and use your leg normally.

The most common treatment for a post fracture of the tibia is to wear a cast or a brace. A cast covers your whole leg and foot, while a brace only covers the area around your knee joint.

Post Fracture Brace

The post fracture brace is used for treating post fractures of the tibia in adults and children who are at least 5 years old. It’s important that you wear this brace as instructed by your doctor or physical therapist, so you don’t risk injuring yourself further by not wearing it properly.

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