PIP-DIP Post-Traumatic Contracture

PIP-DIP Post-Traumatic Contracture?

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PIP-DIP Post-Traumatic Contracture?

Hand

What is PIP-DIP Post-Traumatic Contracture?

PIP-DIP Post-Traumatic Contracture is a condition that causes the fingers to become stiff and immobile. It’s an issue that can occur after injuries to the hand, such as broken bones or tendon tears. The contracture usually occurs in the pinkie and ring finger, but it can also affect the middle finger or even all four fingers.

What are the types of PIP-DIP Post-Traumatic Contracture?

The two most common areas of injury where this type of contracture may occur are:

1) Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

When there are multiple ligaments that become inflamed, swelling can cause pressure on nerves which may result in numbness, tingling sensations, weakness or pain within the hand or fingers

2) Trigger Finger

In this case, one or more fingers will not straighten completely because there are trigger points where tendons attach to muscles

What are the causes of PIP-DIP Post-Traumatic Contracture?

PIP-DIP Post-Traumatic Contracture is a post-traumatic contracture of the proximal interphalangeal joint.

The causes of PIP-DIP Post-Traumatic Contracture can be hard to pinpoint, but there are a few possibilities.

  1. One cause of PIP flexion contracture is a lack of extensor power at the PIP joint. This can happen if there is an injury or trauma to the extensor pollicis longus tendon or its insertion on the distal phalanx. Another possibility is that there may be decreased excursion of flexor tendons, which can lead to capsular or ligamentous contractures as well as bony blocks or exostoses resulting from malunited fractures.
  2. Another cause of PIP flexion contracture comes from overuse or repetitive movements with your hands, which can lead to soft tissue injury and inflammation in your wrist and hand area (this includes carpal tunnel syndrome).

What are the symptoms of PIP-DIP Post-Traumatic Contracture?

The symptoms of PIP-DIP Post-Traumatic Contracture can include:

  • Pain in the finger that gets worse when you bend the finger
  • Stiffness in the finger
  • Inability to bend the finger fully or at all
  • Swelling, redness and warmth around the joint
  • Difficulty moving your finger or thumb

What are the risk factors for PIP-DIP Post-Traumatic Contracture?

The risk factors for PIP-DIP Post-Traumatic Contracture are:

  1. Poor or no hand function after the injury (especially if you had surgery to repair your hand)
  2. A history of repetitive motion injury (for example, if you’re a mechanic or a construction worker)
  3. Having an injury that required surgical repair of the tendons in your wrist

Recommended Exercise

Hand

What are the exercises for PIP-DIP Post-Traumatic Contracture?

The exercises for PIP-DIP Post-Traumatic Contracture are designed to help you regain the range of motion in your hand.

They are as follows:

1. Finger extension

Stretch your fingers out and hold for 30 seconds, then relax for 30 seconds. Repeat this 10 times.

2. Finger flexion

Make a fist and hold for 30 seconds, then relax for 30 seconds. Repeat this 10 times.

3. Wrist flexion

Hold your hand out straight and make a fist with your thumb facing up, then rotate it so that your thumb faces down and away from you. Hold this position for 30 seconds, and then relax for 30 seconds. Repeat this 10 times.

What are the treatments for PIP-DIP Post-Traumatic Contracture?

The treatment for PIP-DIP Post-Traumatic Contracture depends on the severity of your case. If you have mild pain or discomfort, your doctor may recommend over-the-counter painkillers, such as ibuprofen or acetaminophen.

If your symptoms are more severe, your doctor may prescribe more powerful medications like opioids or muscle relaxants. These medications can help reduce inflammation and relieve pain, but they also have serious side effects that could make it difficult to work or carry out daily activities.

If you have limited mobility in your hand due to PIP-DIP Post-Traumatic Contracture, your doctor may recommend physical therapy to help restore motion and flexibility to your hand and wrist. This treatment can also help prevent further damage from occurring while you heal from this condition.

Explanation of Recommended Orthotic Device

Hand

What brace is used for PIP-DIP Post-Traumatic Contracture?

The 3pp Step Up Splint is a brace that’s used to treat PIP-DIP Post-Traumatic Contracture. This is a condition in which the patient has lost the ability to extend their fingers and wrist, which can make it difficult for them to complete daily tasks like opening jars or washing their hands.

The 3pp Step Up Splint provides static progressive tension with its design and adjustable Velcro straps. The splint is made from a breathable material that allows air circulation and prevents skin irritation, so it’s comfortable enough for extended use.

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