Peroneal Tendonitis

Peroneal Tendonitis

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Peroneal Tendonitis

Knee

What is Peroneal Tendonitis?

Peroneal tendonitis is an injury to the peroneus longus tendon, which is located on the outside of your lower leg. It can cause pain in the outer ankle or foot.

The peroneal tendons run along the outside of your lower leg and connect to your fibula (small bone) just below the knee joint. They help stabilize the outside of your foot while you’re running or walking.

Peroneal tendonitis is often caused by overuse and repetitive movements, such as running or jumping. You may also experience this injury if you have tight calf muscles, which puts extra stress on the peroneal tendons when you move your foot.

What are the types of Peroneal Tendonitis?

There are three basic types of peroneal tendon injuries:

Tendonitis

Damage to the peroneal tendons can occur as a result of overuse, leading to inflammation and pain. The condition usually goes away on its own within a few weeks.

Tendonitis is an inflammation of the tendon that connects the upper part of the foot to the fibula (calf bone). This type of tendonitis usually occurs due to overuse or repetitive stress on the tendon.

Tears

Peroneal tendon tears are more serious than tendonitis and can lead to instability in the knee joint.

Tears occur when there is damage to the actual fibers that make up your peroneal tendon. These tears are often caused by trauma, such as falling or twisting your ankle in an awkward way.

Subluxation

This condition is characterized by partial dislocation of the ankle bone from its socket.

Subluxation occurs when your foot rolls inward excessively, causing pain and inflammation in both tendons. While this condition may not be directly caused by a specific injury, it can be brought on by wearing high heels or shoes with poor arch support.

How to diagnose Peroneal Tendonitis?

Peroneal tendonitis is often misdiagnosed because it can mimic many other problems. It is a type of tendonitis, which is an inflammation of the tendon.

The most common symptoms are pain and swelling in the outer ankle area. The pain usually worsens when you put weight on your foot or ankle, such as when walking or running. The pain may also be worse when you’re sitting with your ankle bent up to 90 degrees for a long time, such as while driving.

In addition to pain, you may feel a snapping sensation when you move your ankle up and down or rotate it inward and outward. Your foot may also turn pale because blood flow to it decreases when the peroneal tendon becomes inflamed.

What are the symptoms of Peroneal Tendonitis?

Peroneal tendonitis is a condition that causes pain in the lower leg. It’s caused by inflammation of the peroneal tendons, which are located at the outside of your ankles.

The symptoms of peroneal tendonitis include:

  • Pain on the outside of your ankle
  • Pain when you walk or stand up from a seated position
  • Stiffness or tightness in your calf muscles

What are the causes of Peroneal Tendonitis?

Peroneal Tendonitis is an inflammation of the peroneal tendons.

This condition is caused by repetitive motion, such as running or walking. It can also be caused by overuse of your ankle joint, which can happen when you wear high heels or stand on your toes for long periods of time.

The peroneal tendons are located on the outer side of your ankle. They connect your calf muscles to your foot. When these tendons are injured, they swell and become inflamed due to a buildup of fluid or tissue damage from overuse or injury. The swelling can cause pain and stiffness in your ankle joint when you move it up and down, twist it side-to-side or make a sudden movement with it.

What are the risk factors for Peroneal Tendonitis?

There are a number of risk factors for peroneal tendonitis, which can cause pain near the outside of your ankle. Risk factors include:

  • Overuse of your Achilles tendon, which attaches to your calf muscles, for example by frequently running or jumping
  • Injury to your Achilles tendon or surrounding tissues, such as an ankle sprain
  • Foot problems such as flat feet and high arches

Recommended Exercise

Knee

What are the exercises for Peroneal Tendonitis?

There are several exercises that can help relieve peroneal tendonitis pain and increase mobility if you have this condition.

Towel stretch

This exercise helps stretch out your calf muscles, which can be tight if you have peroneal tendonitis.

To do this stretch, you’ll need a towel or belt—anything you can use as a strap. Sit on the floor with your legs extended in front of you and place the strap around your ankles. Pull your ankle towards your knee until you feel a stretch in the back of your knee. Hold this position for 30 seconds, then relax for 30 seconds before repeating 2-3 times.

Calf wall stretch

The calf wall stretch will help you to release tension in your peroneal tendon, which is the primary cause of peroneal tendonitis.

Stand with one foot up against a wall while holding onto something sturdy for balance such as a chair or table leg. Bend at the waist so that your hands come down towards the floor and rest them on either side of your straightened leg; continue until you feel a stretch in both calves and Achilles tendons. Hold this position for 30 seconds then relax for 30 seconds before repeating 2-3 times on each side if needed

What are the treatments for Peroneal Tendonitis?

Peroneal tendonitis is a common cause of heel pain. It’s caused by the peroneal tendons pulling on the outside of your foot when you walk, which can lead to inflammation and pain.

Treatment for peroneal tendonitis typically involves rest, ice, compression, and elevation (RICE). If symptoms persist after 3-4 weeks of RICE therapy, physical therapy may be recommended.

Physical therapy may include exercises designed to strengthen the muscles around your ankle and foot, as well as stretching exercises that help loosen up tightness in these areas. You may also receive shoe inserts or heel lifts if your shoes do not fit properly or if you have flat feet.

Explanation of Recommended Orthotic Device

Knee

What brace is used for Peroneal Tendonitis?

The best treatment for peroneal tendonitis is to wear an ankle brace or splint with a heel strap. This helps reduce pain and provides support for your foot and ankle as you recover from the injury.

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