PCL Tear

PCL Tear

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Recommended Exercise

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Orthotic Device And Benefits

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PCL Tear

Knee

What is PCL Tear?

PCL Tear is a tear to the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL). The PCL is one of the four key stabilizing ligaments in the knee. It attaches to the back of your thighbone and to your shinbone, where it helps to stop your knee from moving too far backward and rotating.

A PCL tear is an injury that can happen during sports or other physical activities like dancing, skiing or gymnastics. It can also happen if you fall down or twist your knee awkwardly.

How to diagnose PCL Tear?

The diagnosis of a torn posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) can be made based on the history and physical examination.

A patient may report pain when the knee is bent and straightened (when walking, running, squatting or jumping), or when twisting the knee inward and outward. The doctor will examine the knee by bending it forward and backward, as well as flexing and extending it.

Pain with certain movements may indicate a torn PCL. X-rays may be ordered to rule out other injuries that could cause similar symptoms, such as ruptured ligaments or cartilage damage.

MRI scans are also helpful in making this diagnosis because they allow for visualization of injured tissue without the need for an invasive procedure such as surgery.

What are the causes of PCL Tear?

PCL Tears are caused by a number of different things. The most common cause is a fall or impact to your knee. Other causes include:

  • Sudden twisting of the knee
  • Sudden pivoting on one foot
  • Jumping from a height of more than 2 feet

What are the symptoms of PCL Tear?

The symptoms of PCL Tear are:

  • Pain in the knee
  • PCL injury can occur after an impact to the knee or by twisting suddenly and forcefully.
  • The pain is often felt in the front and back of the knee, which can be described as a deep ache or sharp pain that worsens with activity.

What are the risk factors of PCL Tear?

There are a number of risk factors that can lead to a PCL tear. Some of these include:

Age – a person’s age can play a role in the development of a PCL tear, as older people tend to have more joint and ligament issues.

Gender – men are more likely to suffer from PCL tears than women, who typically do not experience this injury as often.

Activity level – people who engage in high-impact activities such as running or playing football may be at an increased risk for developing PCL tears because they put more stress on their knees.

Recommended Exercise

Knee

What are the treatments for PCL Tear?

If you are diagnosed with a PCL Tear, your doctor will likely recommend one of several different treatments. These include:

Physical Therapy – Physical therapy can help you strengthen the muscles around your knee and improve flexibility.

Brace – A brace helps stabilize and support your knee while it heals.

Surgery – If your PCL Tear does not heal on its own or if it causes ongoing problems, surgery may be necessary to repair the tear.

What are the exercises for PCL Tear?

If you’ve been diagnosed with a torn PCL, you may be wondering what exercises are safe for your injury. Here are some ideas:

Quad sets

These are a great way to work on your quadriceps and help with your knee stability.

The exercise involves lying on the floor on your back with both feet flat on the floor, knees bent and ankles crossed. Lift one foot off the ground and hold it there, while keeping your hips and shoulders still. Perform three sets of 25 repetitions per leg.

Calf raises

This is another good exercise for helping to stabilize your knee as well as strengthening the calf muscles which attach at the knee joint.

Stand tall with good posture, keeping your feet shoulder-width apart. Slowly lift up onto your toes by bending at the ankle joint, then lower yourself back down slowly taking care not to let any part of your body touch down before reaching full hip extension again (this will help prevent injury). Repeat this exercise 10 times per set, 3 sets total per day (morning/afternoon/evening).

Hamstring curls

This is an exercise that strengthens the muscles around your knee; it may help stabilize your knee when you’re walking or doing more active exercises.

Lie on your back with legs straight up in the air. Bend one leg at the knee and hold it with both hands at about waist height. With control and no bouncing, gently lower your leg down to the floor on the other side of your body (like an upside-down “C”). Repeat 10 times on each side.

Quarter squats

Quarter squats are a great way to build up strength in your quadriceps, so they’ll be able to help stabilize your knee during everyday activities like walking and running.

Stand with feet shoulder-width apart or slightly wider; keep knees behind toes as you lower yourself into a squat until thighs are parallel to floor. Hold for 1 count then press through heels back to starting position while keeping spine straight throughout exercise; repeat 10 times (or more if comfortable).

Lunge

Lunges strengthen your hamstrings and quads while also stretching out tight hip flexors (which can get shorter if you sit at a desk all day).

Stand with your feet hip-width apart and your hands on your hips. Take a big step forward with one leg and bend both knees until you feel a stretch in the front of that hip and thigh.

Heel drops

Heel drops can help with balance, which is key for people who have injuries like PCL tears.

Stand on the edge of a step with your heels hanging off the edge and your toes on the floor below. Slowly lower one heel down as far as comfortable, then raise it back to starting position before lowering the other heel down as far. Do 10 reps on each side before switching sides (20 reps total).

Explanation of Recommended Orthotic Device

Knee

What brace is used for PCL Tear?

PCL tears are common in athletes and other people who participate in sports that require frequent or intense bending of the knee, such as football and soccer. The PCL is one of four major ligaments in the knee, and it helps to stabilize the knee joint.

A hinged knee brace is designed to support a PCL tear while you’re healing from it. It has hinges at the front of your knee, which give you more flexibility than other braces might offer while still providing support for your injury.

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