Patellar Tendon Tear

Patellar Tendon Tear

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Patellar Tendon Tear

Knee

What is Patellar Tendon Tear?

Patellar tendon tear (also called patellar tendonitis or patellar tendinopathy) is a condition in which the tendon that connects your kneecap to your shinbone weakens, resulting in pain and swelling.

What are the types of Patellar Tendon Tear?

There are two common types of patellar tendon tear: a partial tear and a complete tear.

Partial Tears

Partial tears are the most common type of patellar tendon injury, making up about 60% of all reported cases. These tend to occur when the tendon is overused or at risk for repetitive stress injuries due to strenuous activities like running or jumping. This can cause small tears in the tendon that may heal on their own with rest and physical therapy.

Complete Tears

Complete tears occur when there is a total detachment of the patellar tendon from the bone below it, which is generally caused by trauma such as falling from an elevated height onto your knee or misstepping and landing awkwardly on your foot.

Complete tears can be treated with surgery, but they rarely heal without proper treatment, so you should seek medical attention immediately if you experience this type of injury.

What are the causes of Patellar Tendon Tear?

There are many causes of patellar tendon tear. Some of the most common include:

  • Injury to the patellar tendon (e.g., from a direct blow or twisting injury)
  • Repeated stress on the patellar tendon (e.g., frequent jumping, running, squatting)
  • Age-related degeneration in your knee that weakens the tendons and ligaments

How to diagnose Patellar Tendon Tear?

The most common sign of a patellar tendon tear is pain in the knee. You may feel pain when you straighten your knee, or you may feel pain when you squat down. The pain may also be worse if you try to walk up stairs or if you kneel on one leg for a long time.

You should see a doctor if your knee hurts for more than two weeks, especially if the pain gets worse after rest. Your doctor will check for tenderness and swelling around your patellar tendon, which is at the front of your knee. They may order an X-ray or MRI scan to look at your knee joint more closely.

What are the symptoms of Patellar Tendon Tear?

Symptoms of a patellar tendon tear can include:

  • Pain in the knee, especially when jumping or squatting
  • Swelling
  • Grating or popping sensation in the knee when bending or straightening the leg
  • Difficulty climbing stairs or going upstairs
  • Decreased strength in your leg muscles

What are the risk factors for Patellar Tendon Tear?

Patellar Tendon Tear is an injury that can happen in any sport or physical activity. The risk factors for Patellar Tendon Tear include:

  • Athletic activities where you jump and land on one leg, such as basketball, volleyball, and track and field events.
  • Overuse of the knee joint. This can happen if you have an injury to the tendon or if you do too much exercise without giving your body time to rest and recover.

Recommended Exercise

Knee

What are the treatments for Patellar Tendon Tear?

Patellar tendon tear is a common injury. The tendon that connects the kneecap to the shinbone (tibia) is torn.

The treatment depends on the severity of your injury. If you’ve suffered a minor tear, you can rest, ice and elevate your leg. You may be able to go back to normal activities within a few weeks.

If your tear is more severe, your doctor may recommend surgery to repair your tendon. Surgery usually involves repairing or replacing the damaged tendon with another piece of tissue from somewhere else in your body (autograft).

Once you’re healed from surgery, you’ll need physical therapy to help restore strength and range of motion in your knee.

What are the exercises for Patellar Tendon Tear?

The exercises for Patellar Tendon Tear include hamstring stretches, calf stretches, and step ups.

Hamstring stretches

Hamstring stretches are useful because they improve the flexibility of your posterior chain muscles. The posterior chain includes the hamstrings, glutes, lower back extensors, and calves. These muscles work together to help you run faster, jump higher, and play sports more effectively.

Stand with your feet hip-width apart and your knees slightly bent. Reach back with both hands and place them on a wall or chair at waist height. Keeping your back straight and your core engaged, lean into the wall until you feel a stretch in the back of your thighs. Hold for 15-30 seconds, then repeat 3 times.

Calf stretches

Calf stretches can help relieve tightness in your calves and Achilles tendons. Tightness in these areas can contribute to pain in your knees and ankles when you exercise.

Stand on one foot (with the other leg bent) and place your hands on a wall or chair at waist height to help balance yourself. Bend at the knee to bring your heel towards your buttocks. Hold for 15-30 seconds, then repeat 3 times on each leg.

Step ups

Step ups are a great way to strengthen your lower legs while also improving your balance. They’re especially helpful if you have knee issues like patellar tendonitis or shin splints—they can help build up strength so that those injuries don’t limit your ability to participate in physical activities like running or jumping rope!

Stand facing a step or bench with one foot on it and the other leg hanging off it (keeping it straight). Slowly lower yourself down into a squatting position without letting either knee touch the ground, then use that momentum to push yourself back up onto the step or bench (where you will be standing). Repeat this 10-15 times on each leg before switching sides so that both legs get equal time working out!

Explanation of Recommended Orthotic Device

Knee

What brace is used for Patellar Tendon Tear?

Knee straps are used for patellar tendon tears.

A knee strap is used to help stabilize the kneecap and reduce pain. The strap is used on the front of the knee and goes around the shinbone. It can be worn during physical activity or while you’re sitting or lying down.

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