Patella Dislocation

Patella Dislocation

VIEW DETAILS

Recommended Exercise

VIEW EXERCISE DETAILS

Orthotic Device And Benefits

VIEW DETAILS

Related Device/Equipment

Orthomed Shoulder Brace

$ 280.00

Orthomed Shoulder Brace

$ 280.00

Orthomed Shoulder Brace

$ 280.00

Orthomed Shoulder Brace

$ 280.00

VIEW ALL PRODUCTS

Patella Dislocation

Knee

What is Patella Dislocation?

Patella dislocation is a condition in which the kneecap (patella) is displaced out of its normal position. This can happen when the tendons that connect the kneecap to the thighbone are stretched, torn, or damaged. It can also happen if there is an injury to the patella.

The patella sits at the front of your knee and acts as a fulcrum for your thighbone to move up and down during walking or running. When you run, for example, your quadriceps muscle contracts and pulls on tendons that are attached to the patella. This causes your thighbone to glide up and down over your kneecap as you move forward with each step.

If something goes wrong with this process, such as wearing down of cartilage around the joint or damage to tendons from an injury, these structures may be unable to keep their proper position relative to each other resulting in dislocation of the patella.

What are the types of Patella Dislocation?

A patellar dislocation is a condition in which the knee cap (patella) moves out of its normal position.

There are three different kinds of patellar dislocations: horizontal, superior, and intracondylar.

Horizontal Dislocation

A horizontal dislocation occurs when the kneecap slips from its normal position and slides laterally over the femur.

Horizontal patellar dislocations occur when the knee is bent and the foot is planted on the ground. In this scenario, the kneecap moves laterally (sideways) out of its normal position.

Superior Dislocation

A superior dislocation occurs when the kneecap slips from its normal position and slides up over the tibia.

Superior dislocations occur when you bend your knee while bearing weight on that leg and push off with your other leg to jump or run. The kneecap moves superiorly (upward) out of its normal position.

Intracondylar Dislocation

An intracondylar dislocation occurs when there is insufficient bone beneath the kneecap for it to stay put in its normal position, causing it to pop out of place.

Intracondylar dislocations occur when you bend your knee while bearing weight on that leg and push off with your other leg to jump or run. The kneecap moves laterally (sideways) out of its normal position and then moves upward, resulting in two types of dislocation at onceā€”an intracondylar patellar dislocation

How to diagnose Patella Dislocation?

Patella dislocation is diagnosed through a physical exam. The doctor will look for swelling and tenderness around the knee joint, as well as other symptoms such as pain, difficulty walking or kneeling, and reduced range of motion.

If you believe that your patella is dislocated, see a doctor immediately.

What are the symptoms of Patella Dislocation?

The symptoms of patella dislocation include:

  • Pain in your knee or groin area
  • Bruising or swelling over the front of your knee or around your patella
  • Instability or popping sensation in your knee
  • Tenderness when you press on the front of your knee or around the patella

What are the causes of Patella Dislocation?

Patella dislocation occurs when the patella (kneecap) slips out of place. The patella is a small bone in the knee that sits on top of the femur, or thighbone. It helps you move your knee and bend your leg.

The main causes of patella dislocation are:

  • Trauma to the knee joint that results in damage to the ligaments (tissues that connect bones to other bones). This can be caused by an injury or surgery.
  • Congenital malformations (diseases present at birth).
  • Injury to the tendons that connect muscle to bone, such as sprains and tears.

What are the risk factors for Patella Dislocation?

One of the most common causes of Patella Dislocation is an injury, such as a fall or sports injury. Other risk factors include:

  • Being born with an abnormally shaped patella (kneecap)
  • Having a bone-growth disorder such as Osgood-Schlatter disease or Legg-Calve-Perthes disease
  • Having other joint problems such as knock knees (genu valgum) or bow legs (genu varum)
  • Wearing high heels or ill-fitting shoes that don’t offer enough support for your knee

Recommended Exercise

Knee

What are the exercises for Patella Dislocation?

If you’re suffering from patella dislocation, the best exercises for you are quadricep contraction, wall slide, straight-leg raise to the front.

Quadricep Contraction

This exercise works on strengthening the quadriceps muscles in your thighs.

Lie on your back with knees bent and feet flat on the floor. Tighten your quads by pressing your knees together without moving them up or down. Hold for 5 seconds, then relax for 5 seconds before repeating 10 times. Do 3 sets of 10 reps daily until healed.

Wall Slide

This exercise helps to strengthen your quadriceps muscle and reduce pain in the knee.

Stand with your back against a wall and your feet about 6 inches away from it. Slowly slide down the wall until you feel tension in your thigh muscles, then hold for 10 seconds and return to starting position. Repeat 10 times for each leg.

Straight-Leg Raise To The Front

It helps you strengthen your quadriceps and hamstring muscles, which are important in keeping your kneecap in place.

To start, lie on your back with your knees bent and feet flat on the floor. Slowly lift one leg up toward the ceiling by straightening the knee. Make sure you don’t bend your other knee or let it drop down toward the floor during this exercise. Hold for five seconds, then lower your leg slowly back down to its starting position. Repeat with each leg ten times before switching sides so that you’re doing twenty repetitions total per set.

What are the treatments for Patella Dislocation?

There are a few different treatments for patella dislocation.

One of the most common is physical therapy, which can help you regain mobility and strengthen your muscles.

Another treatment is Knee Braces, which can help stabilize your knee while you’re recovering.

You may also want to consider surgery if:

1) You don’t respond well to physical therapy

2) You have a severe case of patella dislocation that doesn’t respond well to other treatments.

Explanation of Recommended Orthotic Device

Knee

What brace is used for Patella Dislocation?

The soft knee-sleeve brace is used for patella dislocation. The soft knee-sleeve brace is made of neoprene and has a padded interior, making it comfortable to wear. It has a Velcro closure, which makes it easy to put on and take off. The soft knee-sleeve brace comes in two sizes: small/medium and large/extra large.

The patella stabilizer knee brace is also used for patella dislocations. This type of brace provides support to the kneecap and helps reduce pain from injuries such as patellar dislocation or subluxation. They are usually worn after surgery or when recovering from an injury that causes pain in the knee.

Related Device/Equipment

Orthomed Shoulder Brace

$ 280.00

Orthomed Shoulder Brace

$ 280.00

Orthomed Shoulder Brace

$ 280.00

Orthomed Shoulder Brace

$ 280.00

Request Referral

Specialist Type:

Insurance Type:

Upload Referral Document:

Share

Send by: