Osgood-Schlatter Disease

Osgood-Schlatter Disease

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Osgood-Schlatter Disease

Knee

What is Osgood-Schlatter Disease?

Osgood-Schlatter disease is a disorder of the tibial tuberosity, which is the bony bump on your tibia that connects your patellar tendon to the shinbone. It’s mostly seen in children between the ages of 10 and 15, but can also occur in adults.

Why is it called Osgood-Schlatter Disease?

This injury is named after Dr. Russell Osgood and Dr. George W. Schlatter, who first described it in 1922. The pain from OSD can be very intense, making it hard for kids to participate in sports or do their daily activities.

What are the causes of Osgood-Schlatter disease?

Osgood-Schlatter Disease, or “OSD,” is a common knee injury that affects athletes aged 10 to 15 years old. It’s caused by an inflammation of the growth plate at the tibia (shinbone), which is the part of your leg that connects your knee to your ankle.

Osgood-Schlatter disease is caused by a combination of factors. One of the biggest factors is growth spurts, which can cause muscles to grow faster than tendons and bones. Children who are in their early teens are most susceptible to Osgood-Schlatter disease.

Other causes include:

  • Excessive jumping or running
  • Poor footwear with inadequate support
  • Excessive pronation (the foot rolls inward)
  • Low arches

What are the symptoms of Osgood-Schlatter disease?

The symptoms of Osgood-Schlatter disease include:

  • Pain in the front of your knee when you bend or straighten it
  • Knee swelling and tenderness
  • Tenderness on the upper inside of your knee when you press on it with your fingers
  • Pain in the knee that gets worse when running or jumping
  • Swelling around the knee cap (patella)
  • Joint inflammation, which can lead to limited range of motion and swelling in the knee joint

What are the risk factors of Osgood-Schlatter disease?

The risk factors of Osgood-Schlatter disease include:

  • A history of overuse or repetitive stress injuries
  • A history of patellar tendonitis
  • A history of knee pain or tenderness
  • Excess body weight, especially around the thighs and buttocks
  • Poor flexibility (especially in the lower leg)
  • Poor muscle strength (especially in the quadriceps muscles)

Recommended Exercise

Knee

What are the treatments for Osgood-Schlatter disease?

Treatments for Osgood-Schlatter disease can vary depending on the age of your child and the severity of their symptoms. Most treatments will focus on reducing pain and inflammation.

Physical Therapy

The most common treatment for Osgood-Schlatter disease is physical therapy. The goal of physical therapy is to strengthen the quadriceps and hamstrings, which will help alleviate pain from the condition.

Ice or Heat

Your doctor may also recommend using ice or heat to help reduce swelling, as well as taking an over-the-counter pain reliever such as ibuprofen or acetaminophen.

You should avoid activities that put stress on your knees until your symptoms have subsided and you’ve fully recovered from the condition.

How to diagnose Osgood-Schlatter disease?

Osgood-Schlatter disease is diagnosed by taking a patient’s medical history, performing an exam, and ordering X-rays.

Step 1

The first step in diagnosing Osgood-Schlatter disease is to take a patient’s medical history. This includes asking about any previous injuries or surgeries, as well as any other symptoms that may be related to the condition.

Step 2

Once the doctor has gathered enough information about the patient’s symptoms, he or she will perform a physical exam. This will include checking for tenderness around the knee joint by pressing down on it lightly with one hand while keeping the other hand on top of the thigh muscle just above where it meets with the shin bone (tibia).

The doctor will also check for swelling in this area by gently pressing down on it with his index finger while feeling around with his other hand for any tenderness or lumps underneath skin surface level (subcutaneous).

Step 3

Finally, if there is pain when moving around then that could indicate injury related pain which could indicate Osgood-Schlatter disease.

What are the exercises for Osgood-Schlatter Disease?

The exercises for Osgood-Schlatter Disease are designed to help strengthen your quadriceps, which will help to stabilize the knee joint and reduce pain. The exercises can be done at home, but it’s important to work with a physical therapist or athletic trainer first to ensure that you’re doing the right exercises and using proper form.

Some strengthening exercises include:

  • Straight-leg raises to the front
  • Prone Quadriceps Stretch
  • Hamstring Ballet Stretch
  • Hamstring Doorway Stretch
  • Quadriceps Wall Slide

Straight-Leg Raise to the Front

This exercise strengthens your quadriceps muscles.

The easiest way to do this exercise is to stand with your feet hip-distance apart and one hand on a wall for support. Slowly raise one leg out straight in front of you until it’s parallel with the ground and hold for 5 seconds before returning it back down to start position. Repeat 10 times on each leg every day.

Prone Quadriceps Stretch

This exercise will stretch out your quadriceps muscles and help reduce inflammation from Osgood-Schlatter Disease.

Lie face down on an exercise mat or soft surface and bend one knee so that your foot rests flat on the floor with the other leg extended behind it (like a kickstand). Gently press into the heel of your bent leg while keeping your other foot planted firmly on the ground until you feel a stretch in your quadricep muscle group; hold for 20 seconds before switching

Hamstring Ballet Stretch

This exercise is great for strengthening your hamstrings, as well as working on flexibility.

Stand facing a wall with feet together and place your hands on the wall. Shift your weight to one leg and bend the other knee, keeping your back straight. Hold for 30 seconds. Switch legs and repeat.

Hamstring Doorway Stretch

This stretch is also good for strengthening your hamstrings and improving flexibility.

Stand facing a doorway with one leg stretched behind you in line with your torso. Bend both knees slightly and lean forward while keeping your back straight. Hold for 30 seconds. Switch legs and repeat.

Quadriceps Wall Slide

This exercise strengthens the quadriceps muscles and helps to prevent Osgood-Schlatter disease.

Stand about 3 feet from a wall and place the heel of your right foot against it. Keep your left leg straight and raise your right knee toward your chest as you slowly slide your foot down the wall until it is fully extended. Repeat with the other leg

Explanation of Recommended Orthotic Device

Knee

What brace is used for Osgood-Schlatter disease?

There are many ways to treat Osgood-Schlatter disease: bracing is one of them. There are lots of different types of braces, but knee bands and straps are two examples.

A knee band or strap will help support your child’s knee during physical activity or sports, keeping it from bending too far or twisting in an unnatural way. They’re also great for helping to ease pain because they provide some extra cushion between your child’s skin and their pants so that there isn’t as much pressure on any one spot (which can hurt).

Knee bands are usually made from neoprene material (a type of rubber) while straps are often made from nylon webbing material with Velcro fasteners on each end so they can be adjusted as needed—but there are many other options available too!

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