Metatarsal Fracture

Metatarsal Fracture

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Recommended Exercise

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Orthotic Device And Benefits

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Metatarsal Fracture

Foot

What is Metatarsal Fracture?

A metatarsal fracture is a break to any of the five long bones in the foot. These bones connect to the toes and are responsible for supporting much of your body weight as you walk or run. A fracture is an injury caused by a sudden impact, such as falling down or being hit by another player during sports.

Metatarsal fractures can cause pain, swelling and bruising around the injured area. You may also have difficulty walking and standing on your feet if you have a severe fracture that needs surgery to repair it.

What are the types of Metatarsal Fracture?

There are several different types of metatarsal fracture.

Jones fracture

-A Jones fracture is a relatively simple break that occurs at the base of the fifth metatarsal, which is located in your foot. It is typical for this kind of fracture to occur when you step on something sharp, like a piece of glass or a rock. A Jones fracture usually happens when you’re not wearing shoes or are wearing shoes that don’t provide enough support for your foot. If you have a Jones fracture, it will be painful and swollen. You may also experience numbness or tingling in your toes.

Lisfranc injury

-A Lisfranc injury involves damage to the ligaments and tendons that connect your forefoot to your midfoot and hind foot. These injuries can be very painful and cause swelling and bruising around the area where they occurred.

Metatarsal Stress Fracture

-A metatarsal stress fracture occurs when one or more of the bones in your feet becomes injured due to repeated stress placed on that particular bone over time (such as running on hard surfaces). These fractures can cause pain after walking or standing for long periods of time; however, they typically go away after resting for several days

What are the causes of Metatarsal Fracture?

Metatarsal Fractures are caused by an injury to the foot. The bones in the bottom of your foot, called metatarsals, make up the middle part of your foot. If you have a fracture in one of them, it can cause pain and swelling.

A metatarsal fracture can happen when you step on something hard or drop something heavy on your foot. It can also happen if you fall down and twist your ankle. If you have diabetes or gout, you may be more likely to get a metatarsal fracture.

What are the symptoms of Metatarsal Fracture?

Metatarsal Fracture symptoms are often very similar to other types of foot fractures. They can include:

  • Pain and/or tenderness in the foot right above the toes
  • Tingling or numbness in the toes
  • Bruising around the fracture site
  • Swelling around the fracture site

What are the risk factors for Metatarsal Fracture?

The most common cause of a metatarsal fracture is trauma to your foot from an accident or injury. The following are risk factors that may increase your chances of having metatarsal fractures:

  • You have osteoporosis (a condition in which the bones become weak and brittle).
  • You have rheumatoid arthritis (an autoimmune disease that causes pain and swelling in the joints).
  • You have had previous foot fractures.
  • You have diabetes mellitus (high blood sugar).

Recommended Exercise

Foot

What are the exercises for Metatarsal Fracture?

There are some simple exercises you can do at home to help with a metatarsal fracture.

First, you want to start by doing marble pick-ups. You’ll need a small object that’s easy for you to hold, like a marble or small ball of clay. Then grab your foot with one hand and work your way up the leg with the other. That will strengthen your muscles and improve blood flow to your leg, which will help it heal faster.

Next, try towel scrunches. Lay out some towels on the floor and place one foot on top of each towel, and then scrunch them together using just your toes and heels. This will help keep your ankle stable while also strengthening your legs.

For the last exercise, try towel inversion and eversion (turning in/out). First position yourself so that both feet are facing away from each other (like if you were swimming). Then roll your feet back and forth as far as they’ll go without moving any other part of your body—this will strengthen muscles throughout the lower limb area!

What are the treatments for Metatarsal Fracture?

There are several treatments for metatarsal fractures, depending on the type of fracture and how severe it is.

If you have a simple fracture, meaning that the bone is not broken into many pieces, you can treat it at home with rest and ice. You should not put any weight on your foot while you are resting, and you should apply ice to the injury every two hours for up to 20 minutes at a time.

For more complicated fractures, such as those that involve multiple bones or those that are open wounds (meaning there is an exposed break in the skin), your doctor will likely recommend surgery.

Surgery involves making an incision in your skin near the fracture site so that he or she can see what is going on inside. If necessary, he or she may also need to cut through muscle tissue or tendons so that they can move them out of the way so they can get a better look at your bone fragments and determine what kind of treatment would be best for your specific situation.

Explanation of Recommended Orthotic Device

Back

What brace is used for Metatarsal Fracture?

The compression arch support sleeve is used for metatarsal fracture. It is a soft, lightweight brace that provides mild compression and supports the arch of the foot.

The compression arch support sleeve is made of neoprene, a synthetic rubber that provides warmth to the foot and absorbs perspiration. It features adjustable straps with Velcro closures for easy on-and-off wear.

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