Metacarpophalangeal Joint Arthritis

Metacarpophalangeal Joint Arthritis

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Recommended Exercise

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Orthotic Device And Benefits

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Metacarpophalangeal Joint Arthritis

Hand

What is Metacarpophalangeal Joint Arthritis?

Metacarpophalangeal Joint Arthritis is the inflammation of your knuckles. It can be a painful condition that affects your thumb, index finger, and middle finger.

Metacarpophalangeal joints are the joints located at the base of your fingers where they connect to your hand. These joints are located between the bones on top of each finger and those on the palm side of the fingers.

Common causes of metacarpophalangeal joint arthritis include wear and tear from repetitive tasks like typing or playing instruments or sports. Other causes include injury to these joints from falls or sports injuries.

What are the types of Metacarpophalangeal Joint Arthritis?

There are two types of metacarpophalangeal joint arthritis:

  • Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease that affects the joints and causes inflammation in the metacarpophalangeal joints.
  • Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common form of arthritis that occurs when cartilage wears away from the ends of bones in the knuckles and causes pain and stiffness.

What are the causes of Metacarpophalangeal Joint Arthritis?

There are several different causes of arthritis of the knuckles.

  1. Repetitive motion injuries can cause arthritis in the fingers and hands, especially if you have a job with a lot of hand activity. For example, people who work with their hands as part of their job are at an increased risk for developing arthritis in their knuckles.
  2. Osteoarthritis is a type of joint inflammation that typically affects older adults and can lead to pain and stiffness in joints, including those in your hands and fingers. If you have osteoarthritis in your hands or fingers, you may experience pain or stiffness when gripping objects or twisting them into certain positions.
  3. Rheumatoid arthritis is another type of joint inflammation that often affects older adults and can cause pain, swelling, stiffness and loss of function in joints throughout your body—including those in your hands and fingers!

What are the symptoms of Metacarpophalangeal Joint Arthritis?

The most common symptom of MCP arthritis is stiffness or pain in one or both hands that occurs when you use your hands. The pain can be mild or severe and may be worse at night or first thing in the morning. You may also feel pain when gripping objects such as a doorknob or handlebar of a bike.

Other symptoms include:

  • Swelling in one or more joints
  • Tenderness over affected joint(s)
  • Reduced range of motion in affected joint(s)

What are the risk factors for Metacarpophalangeal Joint Arthritis?

Risk factors for Metacarpophalangeal Joint Arthritis include:

  • Repetitive activities like typing on a computer keyboard or playing sports
  • Obesity and diabetes
  • Certain medications such as steroids and anti-inflammatory drugs
  • People over 60 are more likely to develop metacarpophalangeal joint arthritis.
  • An injury to the hand or wrist, especially one that requires surgery on the hand or wrist.
  • Diabetes mellitus (type 1 or 2).

Recommended Exercise

Hand

What are the exercises for Metacarpophalangeal Joint Arthritis?

The exercises for MCP arthritis are designed to help with range of motion and strength in this joint.

Your doctor may recommend exercises such as:

Wrist circles – Move your wrist in small circles for up to one minute. Repeat five times.

Hand extensions – Extend your fingers straight out from your hand, then curl them back toward you palm. Repeat five times.

Finger flexions – Bend each finger back toward the palm of your hand and hold for two seconds before extending it again. Repeat five times per finger (all 10 fingers).

What are the treatments for Metacarpophalangeal Joint Arthritis?

There are many treatments available for this type of arthritis.

  • Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (also known as NSAIDs) can help reduce pain and swelling.
  • Physical therapy may help improve function in affected joints, as well as strengthen surrounding muscles and ligaments.
  • Corticosteroid injections are another option for treating arthritis, particularly if there is no improvement after several weeks of non-steroidal therapy.
  • In some cases, surgery may be necessary to relieve pressure on a damaged joint or repair torn ligaments or tendons around it. This procedure requires anesthesia and usually only lasts 30 minutes or so depending on what needs to be done during surgery time frame time frame.

Explanation of Recommended Orthotic Device

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What brace is used for Metacarpophalangeal Joint Arthritis?

For Metacarpophalangeal Joint Arthritis, one of the most common treatments is the MCP blocking splint. This is a splint that blocks the metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints and stops you from moving them.

The knuckles of your thumb and index finger are also called MCP joints. These joints are used with other joints in your hand and fingers to help you make movements such as grasping an object or writing. The MCP blocking splint prevents any movement of these joints so they don’t hurt anymore.

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