Meniscus Tear

Meniscus Tear

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Recommended Exercise

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Orthotic Device And Benefits

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Meniscus Tear

Knee

What is Meniscus Tear?

Meniscus Tear is an injury that occurs when the meniscus, which is a circular pad of cartilage between the shinbone and knee cap, is torn. If you have a tear, it will likely cause pain, inflammation, swelling and instability in your knee.

The meniscus is a C-shaped piece of cartilage located between the thigh bone and shin bone in your knee joint. Its purpose is to serve as a shock absorber while also helping to keep your bones aligned during movement. The cartilage that makes up the meniscus can become torn when you twist or fall onto your knee, resulting in pain and swelling of the joint.

What are the types of Meniscus Tear?

In the knee, the meniscus is a C-shaped piece of cartilage that sits between the thighbone and shinbone. It helps with flexibility and shock absorption. A meniscus tear is when the cartilage tears. There are several types of tears that can happen to the meniscus:

Radial Tear – This is a tear that goes from top to bottom on one side of the medial side of your knee.

Horizontal Tear – This is a tear in which both sides of your medial meniscus have been torn at an angle away from each other.

Incomplete Tear – This is a tear in which only part of your medial meniscus has been torn.

Complex Tear – This is a tear that involves multiple parts of your medial meniscus being torn at different angles away from each other.

Flap Tear – This is a tear in which part or all of your meniscus has been completely detached from its attachment point on your tibia (shinbone).

Bucket Handle Tear – This type of tear occurs when pieces of cartilage break off from either side of your meniscus and are left floating around inside your knee joint.

How to diagnose Meniscus Tear?

Meniscus tear is a common knee injury that can occur when the cartilage in your knee gets damaged. If you have pain and swelling in your knee, it’s important to get an accurate diagnosis. Here are some of the signs of meniscus tear:

  1. The pain will be felt in the center or back of your knee.
  2. You may also experience pain when bending or straightening your knee.
  3. Your knee will feel weak and unstable as well as painful when you stand on it with all of your weight; it may give out after only a few steps or squats (if you have a torn meniscus).

What are the causes of Meniscus Tear?

There are several different causes of meniscus tear, including:

Trauma – Meniscus tears can happen after an accident or fall.

Age – As you get older, your meniscus becomes more likely to tear because it becomes thinner and weaker.

Overuse – Overusing your knees can cause damage over time, which may eventually lead to tearing if not treated immediately.

What are the symptoms of Meniscus Tear?

There are many symptoms that may indicate a meniscus tear. These include:

  1. Pain in your knee when you walk or stand on it for long periods of time
  2. Swelling of your knee
  3. A popping sound when walking or bending your knee
  4. Catching or locking sensation in your knee

H2 What are the risk factors for Meniscus Tear?

The risk factors for meniscus tears include:

  • Overuse injuries such as running on hard surfaces or playing sports with lots of cutting and stopping
  • Injury from sudden impact, such as falling while skiing or skating
  • Being overweight
  • Having osteoarthritis

Recommended Exercise

Knee

What are the exercises for Meniscus Tear?

If you’re suffering from a meniscus tear, you probably want to know what exercises are safe for your injury.

Here are some of our favorite moves to help you recover.

Mini-squats

Mini-squats are great for strengthening your quadriceps and glutes without putting too much stress on your knee.

Sit on the floor with your feet together and knees apart. Bend at the waist and touch your hands to the floor in front of you. Then straighten up again. Repeat 10 times.

Hamstring heel digs

Hamstring heel digs are an excellent exercise for working out the muscles in your hamstrings, which can help improve flexibility and prevent further injury.

Lie face down on the floor with your legs straight and heels on a towel or other soft surface. Slowly raise one leg up as high as possible, then lower it back down again. Repeat 10 times (on each leg), three times per day until your pain goes away.

Leg extensions

Leg extensions will help build up strength in your quads by working out individual muscles—and this is a great way to work around any pain caused by the injury.

Sit upright with your knees bent and feet flat on the floor about hip-width apart. Hold dumbbells in both hands; extend one leg out straight from the hip until it’s parallel to the floor (or as close as possible without letting it touch down). Lower back down slowly, then repeat on the other side for 10 reps per side (three sets total).

Clams

Clams are another great way to strengthen the muscles around your knee.

Lie on your side with your knees bent and feet flat on the floor. Lift your top leg off the floor so that your body is supported on both sides by an elbow and a knee each. Hold for 5 seconds at first, working up to 10 seconds as you get stronger over time!

What are the treatments for Meniscus Tear?

There are several treatment options for Meniscus Tear depending on how severe the injury is, but most require rest and time to heal.

There are two main treatments for meniscus tears: surgery and physical therapy.

Surgery involves cutting out the damaged area of cartilage and replacing it with new tissue.

Physical therapy works by strengthening the muscles around your knee so they can protect your joint better and help you move more easily.

Explanation of Recommended Orthotic Device

Knee

What brace is used for Meniscus Tear?

If you have a meniscus tear, an offloader knee brace can be a great option.

An offloader knee brace uses compression and pressure to reduce inflammation, which means it helps with pain management and swelling. The pressure applied by the offloader knee brace helps to limit the amount of stress placed on the meniscus, which in turn reduces irritation and swelling.

In addition to reducing inflammation and pain, an offloader knee brace also prevents further damage from occurring due to overuse or excessive strain.

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