Meniscus Sprain

Meniscus Sprain

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Meniscus Sprain

Knee

What is Meniscus Sprain?

Meniscus Sprain is a tear in the meniscus, a C-shaped fibrous cartilage that acts as a shock absorber in the knee joint. The meniscus is located on the inner side of each knee joint, and connects to the upper and lower leg bones (femur and tibia).

The most common cause of this injury is twisting or turning your knee while it’s “locked” (flexed) or straightened out. A meniscus sprain can also occur when you land awkwardly from a jump.

What are the types of Meniscus Sprain?

In the knee, the meniscus is a C-shaped piece of cartilage that sits between the thighbone and shinbone. It helps with flexibility and shock absorption. A meniscus sprain is when the cartilage tears. There are several types of tears that can happen to the meniscus:

Radial Tear – This is a tear that goes from top to bottom on one side of the medial side of your knee.

Horizontal Tear – This is a tear in which both sides of your medial meniscus have been torn at an angle away from each other.

Incomplete Tear – This is a tear in which only part of your medial meniscus has been torn.

Complex Tear – This is a tear that involves multiple parts of your medial meniscus being torn at different angles away from each other.

Flap Tear – This is a tear in which part or all of your meniscus has been completely detached from its attachment point on your tibia (shinbone).

Bucket Handle Tear – This type of tear occurs when pieces of cartilage break off from either side of your meniscus and are left floating around inside your knee joint.

How to diagnose Meniscus Sprain?

If you have pain in your knee that feels like it’s coming from inside the joint, it could be a meniscus sprain. Symptoms include:

  • A snapping sound when you move your knee
  • Pain that comes on suddenly after an injury or activity
  • Tenderness along the inner edge of your knee where the meniscus attaches to your femur bone
  • Swelling around your joint, especially if you don’t move much while injured

What are the symptoms of Meniscus Sprain?

Meniscus sprains occur most often in athletes who participate in team sports, such as football or basketball, but can also occur in non-athletes.

Symptoms of Meniscus Sprain include:

  • Pain and swelling in the knee
  • Limited range of motion
  • A clicking or popping feeling from the knee when you bend it
  • A feeling like your knee will give out

What are the causes of Meniscus Sprain?

The most common cause of Meniscus Sprain is twisting your knee, which causes one or both of your menisci to tear. It can also happen if you fall on your knee or push it against something sharp, like a rock or a curb.

Meniscus Sprains are more common in people who play sports that require running and jumping, such as soccer, basketball, or football.

Some of the most common are:

  1. Direct trauma to the knee
  2. A sudden change in direction while running or playing sports
  3. A sudden twisting motion, such as when you slip on ice or mud

What are the risk factors for Meniscus Sprain?

The risk factors for Meniscus Sprain include:

Aging – as we age our bones become weaker and more brittle

Osteoarthritis – this is when the articular cartilage in your joints starts to break down, making them more fragile and prone to injury

Excessive weight – if you’re carrying around extra pounds on your body it puts more strain on the joints and ligaments of your knees

Previous injuries – if you’ve had one or more injuries before then there’s more likely to be further damage done next time around

Recommended Exercise

Knee

What are the exercises for Meniscus Sprain?

If you’re suffering from a meniscus sprain, you probably want to know what exercises are safe for your injury.

Here are some of best exercises for Meniscus Sprain:

Mini-squats

Mini-squats are great for strengthening your quadriceps and glutes without putting too much stress on your knee.

Sit on the floor with your feet together and knees apart. Bend at the waist and touch your hands to the floor in front of you. Then straighten up again. Repeat 10 times.

Hamstring heel digs

Hamstring heel digs are an excellent exercise for working out the muscles in your hamstrings, which can help improve flexibility and prevent further injury.

Lie face down on the floor with your legs straight and heels on a towel or other soft surface. Slowly raise one leg up as high as possible, then lower it back down again. Repeat 10 times (on each leg), three times per day until your pain goes away.

Leg extensions

Leg extensions will help build up strength in your quads by working out individual muscles—and this is a great way to work around any pain caused by the injury.

Sit upright with your knees bent and feet flat on the floor about hip-width apart. Hold dumbbells in both hands; extend one leg out straight from the hip until it’s parallel to the floor (or as close as possible without letting it touch down). Lower back down slowly, then repeat on the other side for 10 reps per side (three sets total).

Clams

Clams are another great way to strengthen the muscles around your knee.

Lie on your side with your knees bent and feet flat on the floor. Lift your top leg off the floor so that your body is supported on both sides by an elbow and a knee each. Hold for 5 seconds at first, working up to 10 seconds as you get stronger over time!

What are the treatments for Meniscus Sprain?

The treatments for meniscus sprains include:

  • Resting, icing and elevating your knee to reduce swelling
  • Using crutches to help with weight bearing if you can’t put any weight on your leg
  • Wearing a brace if you have an unstable knee joint, or if you have torn the ACL (anterior cruciate ligament) or PCL (posterior cruciate ligament) in addition to the meniscus sprain
  • Physical therapy – Your doctor may recommend exercises to strengthen your thigh muscles, improve flexibility around the joint, and increase blood flow to improve healing time.

Explanation of Recommended Orthotic Device

Knee

What brace is used for Meniscus Sprain?

If you have a meniscus sprain, an offloader knee brace can be a great option.

An offloader knee brace uses compression and pressure to reduce inflammation, which means it helps with pain management and swelling. The pressure applied by the offloader knee brace helps to limit the amount of stress placed on the meniscus, which in turn reduces irritation and swelling.

In addition to reducing inflammation and pain, an offloader knee brace also prevents further damage from occurring due to overuse or excessive strain.

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