Medial Collateral Ligament Tear

Medial Collateral Ligament Tear

VIEW DETAILS

Recommended Exercise

VIEW EXERCISE DETAILS

Orthotic Device And Benefits

VIEW DETAILS

Related Device/Equipment

Orthomed Shoulder Brace

$ 280.00

Orthomed Shoulder Brace

$ 280.00

Orthomed Shoulder Brace

$ 280.00

Orthomed Shoulder Brace

$ 280.00

VIEW ALL PRODUCTS

Medial Collateral Ligament Tear

Knee

What is Medial Collateral Ligament Tear?

The medial collateral ligament (MCL) is one of the four main ligaments that support the knee joint. The MCL connects the femur (thigh bone) to the tibia (shin bone) on the inner side of your knee and helps to prevent side-to-side movement of your knee joint.

A medial collateral ligament tear occurs when there is damage or injury to this ligament. This can be caused by certain types of sports activities, such as football or rugby, or from falling onto an outstretched hand with your knee bent.

How does MCL tear occur?

During an MCL tear, one or more of these fibers are stretched or torn. Medial collateral ligament injuries usually occur when the knee is bent and twisted, such as during sports or other physical activity.

Medial collateral ligament tears can be partial or complete depending on how much of the ligament has been damaged. A partial tear may heal with rest and rehabilitation while a complete tear may require surgery to repair it correctly so that you can return to normal function and activity level without pain or discomfort.

What are the types of Medial Collateral Ligament Tear?

There are two types of medial collateral ligament tears: grade 1 and grade 2. Grade 1 tears are mild, while grade 2 tears are more severe.

Grade 1 Medial Collateral Ligament Tears

A grade 1 medial collateral ligament tear occurs when one or more of the fibers in this ligament is torn. You may feel some soreness and stiffness in your knee when you run or jump, but it’s usually not too painful to walk on. It may take weeks or months for this injury to heal completely.

Grade 2 Medial Collateral Ligament Tears

A grade 2 medial collateral ligament tear is much more serious than a grade 1 tear because more muscle tissue has been damaged by the force of impact. When you have a grade 2 tear, your knee may swell up from internal bleeding inside your joint capsule. You’ll likely experience significant pain when walking and running—even at slow speeds—and there may be limited range of motion because of swelling around your kneecap (patellar tendon).

What are the causes of Medial Collateral Ligament Tear?

Medial collateral ligament tears are caused by a direct blow or twisting of the knee. The medial collateral ligament can also be injured when playing sports that involve contact with another player, such as football or basketball.

Medial collateral ligament tears most often occur during sports or other physical activities. You might have this injury if you:

  • Have had previous injuries to your knee, hip, or ankle
  • Are overweight or obese
  • Are older than 40 years old

What are the symptoms of Medial Collateral Ligament Tear?

Symptoms of an MCL tear include:

  • Pain at the inner side of the knee joint
  • Swelling and bruising at the inner side of the knee joint
  • Instability in the affected leg, with an inability to straighten or bend it fully
  • A popping or cracking sound when bending or straightening your leg

How to prevent Medial Collateral Ligament Tear?

You can prevent medial collateral ligament tears by strengthening your quadriceps muscles with exercises that focus on balance, like lunges and squats. Avoiding landing on the outside of your foot when doing jumps or cutting is also important.

Recommended Exercise

Knee

What are the treatments for Medial Collateral Ligament Tear?

Treatment for an MCL tear depends on how severe it is, as well as other factors such as your age and whether it’s your first time tearing your MCL. In most cases, surgery is not necessary if you can go without surgery.

The treatment for Medial Collateral Ligament Tears includes rest and ice to reduce swelling, anti-inflammatory medications to reduce pain and swelling, physical therapy exercises to strengthen surrounding muscles in order to improve stability around the knee joint. Steroid injections are also used for treating Medial Collateral Ligament Tear by reducing pain and inflammation associated with this condition.

Explanation of Recommended Orthotic Device

Knee

What type of braces are used for Medial Collateral Ligament Tear?

Hinged-knee braces are used to treat injuries to the medial collateral ligament, a ligament that runs along the inside of your knee. These braces can be used as part of an immobilization or rehabilitation program, or they can be worn during sports activities.

The brace is designed to stabilize your knee while it heals. It may also help prevent injury to other parts of your knee by reducing stress on them while you move around.

The brace is made up of two separate pieces: one that fits around your thigh and one that wraps around the outside of your knee. The two halves are connected by straps that hold them together.

Related Device/Equipment

Orthomed Shoulder Brace

$ 280.00

Orthomed Shoulder Brace

$ 280.00

Orthomed Shoulder Brace

$ 280.00

Orthomed Shoulder Brace

$ 280.00

Request Referral

Specialist Type:

Insurance Type:

Upload Referral Document:

Share

Send by: