Medial Collateral Ligament Injury

Medial Collateral Ligament Injury

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Medial Collateral Ligament Injury

Knee

What is Medial Collateral Ligament Injury?

Medial collateral ligament injuries, or MCL injuries, are common in contact sports and other activities that involve direct knee contact. This is because the MCL is responsible for stabilizing the knee when it is bent or twisted.

The medial collateral ligament (MCL) is one of four major ligaments that stabilize the knee joint. When it’s injured, you may feel pain on the inside of your knee. The injury can occur suddenly during a forceful impact or gradually over time if you have chronic instability in your knees.

What are the types of Medial Collateral Ligament Injury?

Medial Collateral Ligament Injury, or MCL, is a common knee injury. It occurs when the ligament connecting the femur and tibia is torn or sprained. An MCL injury can be graded 1, 2 or 3.

Grade 1 Medial Collateral Ligament Injuries

Grade 1 MCL injuries are mild. They include a stretch of the ligament and no tearing of the fibers. This can cause pain but not instability in the knee joint.

Grade 2 Medial Collateral Ligament Injuries

Grade 2 MCL injuries are moderate. They include partial tearing of the ligament’s fibers, causing some instability in the joint.

Grade 3 Medial Collateral Ligament Injuries

Grade 3 MCL injuries are severe and may result in complete rupture of the ligament’s fibers as well as a tear to other structures in the knee such as cartilage or meniscus.

How to diagnose Medial Collateral Ligament Injury?

Medial Collateral Ligament (MCL) injuries are one of the most common knee injuries. They occur when the Medial Collateral Ligament is strained or torn. The MCL is a ligament that runs along the inside of your knee, connecting your thigh bone to your shin bone.

When you have an MCL injury, there may be swelling and bruising around your knee. You may also feel pain that worsens when you put weight on your leg or move it in certain directions. These symptoms can occur suddenly or gradually over time, depending on how severe the injury is.

Your doctor will examine your knee and perform tests to determine if there’s any damage to the MCL, such as:

Anteroposterior (AP) views—These X-rays show the front and back of your knee joint from different angles; they’re used to check for tears in muscles, tendons or ligaments

Lateral collateral ligament (LCL) view—This X-ray shows how well the ACL and PCL are working together; it can also help detect other problems with bones and cartilage

What are the symptoms of Medial Collateral Ligament Injury?

Symptoms of medial collateral ligament injury include:

  • Pain and tenderness in the knee that worsens with activity
  • Swelling and warmth around the knee
  • Tightness in the knee when bent
  • Limited range of motion (can’t straighten or bend your knee)

What are the causes of Medial Collateral Ligament Injury?

The most common cause of this injury is a sudden change in direction. For example, if you are running and suddenly change direction, your knee will quickly turn towards the inside before you start to run again. If your knee turns too far, it can cause the MCL to stretch or tear.

Another common cause of MCL injury is when someone lands on their foot after jumping or landing from a height. This sudden impact can also put too much pressure on the ligament and cause it to stretch or tear.

What are the risk factors for Medial Collateral Ligament Injury?

The risk factors for Medial Collateral Ligament Injury include:

A prior history of injury or surgery on that knee;

  • Excessive pronation of the foot (the toes turn inward);
  • Jumping mechanics that put too much stress on the knee;
  • Rapid deceleration when running downhill;
  • Playing through pain in one knee.

Recommended Exercise

Knee

What are the exercises for Medial Collateral Ligament Injury?

The exercises for a medial collateral ligament Ijury are as follows:

These exercises help you regain your full range of motion and strengthen your muscles so that you can continue to engage in sports and activities without injuring your knee further.

Hip Adduction

Lie on your side with your knees bent at 90 degrees, hips touching, and feet flat on the floor. Lift the top leg up toward the ceiling and hold for 10 seconds. Repeat this exercise 15 times per day.

Hip Abduction

Lie on your back with knees bent at 90 degrees and feet flat on the floor. Lift one foot off the ground about six inches and hold for 10 seconds; repeat this exercise 15 times per day.

Passive Knee Extension

This exercise helps with your range of motion and strengthens the muscles around your knee joint.

Lie on your back with both knees bent at 90 degrees. Use a towel or strap to wrap around the ball of your foot and hold it down while you slowly straighten your knee. Hold for 5 seconds at the top of the motion, then slowly return to the starting position. Repeat 10 times per day.

Heel Slide

This exercise helps strengthen the muscles around your hip and knee joints, helping them to work better together when moving around during daily activities such as walking or running.

Sit on the floor with both legs straight out in front of you and your heels together. Slide them apart as far as they will go without pain or discomfort; then slide them back together again slowly until they touch (don’t let them bump!). Do this 10 times per day.

What are the treatments for Medial Collateral Ligament Injury?

The most common treatment for medial collateral ligament injuries is a period of rest. This means avoiding weight-bearing activities such as running or jumping until the pain and swelling have subsided. Ice can be used to reduce swelling and pain.

Physical therapy is an important part of treating medial collateral ligament injuries because it helps strengthen the surrounding muscles. A physical therapist will teach you exercises that strengthen these muscles, which may include:

Quadriceps strengthening exercises—such as leg extensions or squats—to help stabilize your knee joint during walking or running.

Gliding exercises—such as side lunges—to improve your ability to move smoothly through space without putting too much stress on your knee joint.

Balance training exercises—such as one-legged balancing drills—to help reduce your risk of falling by improving muscle coordination around joints in both legs.

Explanation of Recommended Orthotic Device

Knee

What brace is used for Medial Collateral Ligament Injury?

The best brace for medial collateral ligament injuries is a hinged brace.

A hinged brace will not only help support the knee, but it also allows you to walk more easily and keep your leg from getting stiff.

It’s important to always use crutches when you have a medial collateral ligament injury. Using crutches can help reduce pain and swelling in your knee, which will allow your injury to heal faster.

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