Lumbar Sprain

Lumbar Sprain

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Recommended Exercise

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Lumbar Sprain

Back

What is Lumbar Sprain?

Lumbar Sprain (also known as lumbago) is a common injury that affects the lower back. It happens when your ligaments—the tough bands of tissue that connect your bones together—are stretched or torn.

The lumbar spine is made up of five vertebrae, called L1–L5. These vertebrae are separated by discs that act as shock absorbers for the spine. The discs are made of tough, fibrous material called cartilage. Each disc has an outer ring of strong fibers called annulus fibroids and an inner gel-like center called nucleus pulposus.

There are two ligaments that attach to each vertebrae: lateral and posterior longitudinal ligament (PLF). The PLF attaches to the front and back sides of each vertebral body, while the anterior longitudinal ligament (ALL) attaches to both sides of the vertebral bodies in front.

The purpose of these ligaments is to provide stability and prevent excessive motion in your lower back region. When they become injured, they can cause pain, swelling and tenderness, which can lead to inflammation if not treated properly.

What are the types of Lumbar Sprain?

Lumbar Sprain can be classified into three main categories:

Grade I Sprains

These are the least severe cases of lumbar sprain and are characterized by mild pain and minimal loss of function. They can occur when the ligaments surrounding the spinal discs become stretched or overstretched when an athlete is participating in sports activities such as football, baseball, gymnastics or basketball.

Grade II Sprains

These are more severe than Grade I sprains, but still do not cause any instability to the spine. Grade II sprains involve mild to moderate pain and reduced mobility in the injured area which can last from several days to several weeks depending on how quickly healing takes place after treatment has been provided by your doctor or chiropractor.

Grade III Sprains

These are considered to be the most serious type of lumbar sprain because they cause instability within the spine itself which can lead to permanent damage if left untreated for too long (more than a week). This type of injury often requires surgery in order to repair damaged ligaments before they become completely torn apart during physical activity while playing sports such as football or basketball where quick movements occur regularly between players while running downfield towards

What are the symptoms of Lumbar Sprain?

The symptoms of Lumbar Sprain include:

  • Lower back pain, which can be felt above or below the waist.
  • Pain that worsens with movement, particularly when twisting.
  • Pain that improves with rest, but returns when you try to move again.

What are the causes of Lumbar Sprain?

The most common cause of Lumbar Sprain is overuse. Overuse most commonly occurs when someone exercises too much or too often, or when they play a sport that requires repetitive movements.

Other most common causes of Lumbar Sprain are:

  • Sports injuries—especially those that involve high impact or twisting motions such as basketball, soccer, and football
  • Car accidents—whiplash is a form of Lumbar Sprain that can occur if you are hit from behind in a car accident
  • Accidental falls—such as falling off a ladder or slipping on the stairs

What are the risk factors for Lumbar Sprain?

Lumbar sprain is a condition that affects the muscles, tendons, and ligaments that support the spine. Lumbar sprain is most common in individuals who are active and participate in sports. Lumbar sprain may also occur due to a fall or by lifting heavy objects.

Lumbar sprains are most often caused by sudden movements and falls. Other risk factors include:

  • Excessive twisting
  • Sudden stops or quick changes in direction
  • Walking with your knees bent for an extended period of time

How to prevent Lumbar Sprain?

Lumbar Sprain is an injury that can happen to anyone. It occurs when the ligaments in your lower back are overstretched or torn.

The best way to prevent Lumbar Sprain is to avoid activities that put you at risk for a sprain. If you do experience a lumbar sprain, you can help speed up recovery by following these tips:

  • Apply ice to the area for 15 minutes every hour for the first 48 hours after injury.
  • Gently stretch and massage your lower back muscles daily until the pain subsides.
  • Avoid sitting or standing for long periods of time; this will allow your back muscles and ligaments to rest while they heal.

Recommended Exercise

Back

What are the exercises for Lumbar Sprain?

When you have a lumbar sprain, it’s important to get the right exercises to help you recover.

Here are three exercises that will help:

Leg Slides

This exercise focuses on stretching the hamstrings, which are a common cause of lower back pain.

  • Stand up straight and place one foot on top of a chair or bench. Slide your foot back and forth along the edge of the bench. Do this for 30 seconds, then switch sides.

Hip Bridge

This exercise focuses on strengthening your glutes, another common cause of lower back pain.

-Lie down on your back with your hands by your sides and knees bent at about 90 degrees. Lift your hips up as high as possible, hold for 10 seconds, then release slowly. Repeat this five times.

Partial Crunches

Partial crunches are designed to strengthen abdominal muscles that support proper posture while sitting or standing upright (which we often do throughout our waking hours).

-Lie down on your back with your hands by your sides and knees bent at about 90 degrees. Lift your hips off the floor as much as possible without feeling pain in your lower back; hold for 10 seconds; then release slowly down to the starting position (without letting go of tension). Repeat this five times.

What are the treatments for Lumbar Sprain?

Treatment for lumbar sprains varies based on the severity of your injury, but it usually includes rest, ice, compression and elevation (RICE). You can also try taking anti-inflammatory medications to reduce swelling and pain.

If these treatments don’t work, your doctor may recommend physical therapy or steroid injections. If your injury is severe enough, surgery may be required.

Explanation of Recommended Orthotic Device

Back

What brace is used for Lumbar Sprain?

A lumbosacral orthosis (LSO) is a back brace used to support the lower back. It’s often prescribed for those who have suffered from a lumbar sprain.

The LSO helps to promote healing, relieve pain and stiffness, and prevent future injuries.

It also provides support for the lower spine, which can help reduce stress on the lumbar muscles and ligaments.

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