Lumbar Progressive Scoliosis

Lumbar Progressive Scoliosis

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Recommended Exercise

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Orthotic Device And Benefits

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Lumbar Progressive Scoliosis

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What is Lumbar Progressive Scoliosis?

Lumbar Progressive scoliosis is a type of spinal deformity that can be seen in children and adults. The condition is also referred to as Scheuermann’s disease.

Progressive scoliosis occurs when one side of the spine curves more than the other side. This can happen because of a spinal abnormality, such as a rib hump or bony growth on the vertebrae.

In adults, progressive scoliosis may be caused by a degenerative disorder called spondylosis or osteoarthritis.

How to diagnose Lumbar Progressive Scoliosis?

Lumbar Progressive Scoliosis can be diagnosed by a doctor by performing a physical exam and taking into account your medical history.

The doctor will look for any signs of scoliosis (a sideways curvature of the spine), such as a small curvature in the lower back that gets worse over time. The doctor will also ask about other symptoms you may have and look at your family history to see if anyone else has had scoliosis.

The doctor may also order an x-ray, which can show if there is any spinal curvature or rotation. If your doctor thinks you might have Lumbar Progressive Scoliosis, he or she may refer you to a specialist who can perform more tests to confirm the diagnosis.

What are the symptoms of Lumbar Progressive Scoliosis?

Lumbar Progressive Scoliosis is a type of scoliosis that affects the lower back. It is progressive, which means it gets worse over time. The two main symptoms are:

1) Curvature of the spine in one direction

2) A loss of lumbar lordosis (the natural curve of the lower spine)

Other symptoms include:

  • Pain in the back and hips
  • Difficulty walking or standing for long periods of time
  • Muscle weakness in the legs

What are the causes of Lumbar Progressive Scoliosis?

Progressive scoliosis is caused by a combination of factors, including genetics and environment. These factors can contribute to the curvature of your spine, but it’s important to note that not all cases of progressive scoliosis are related to these causes. In fact, most cases are idiopathic, meaning that the cause is unknown.

What are the risk factors for Lumbar Progressive Scoliosis?

Progressive scoliosis is a condition that develops in children and teens. It’s characterized by a backward curve in the spine, and it can get worse over time.

Risk factors for progressive scoliosis include:

  • Genetics
  • Poor posture
  • Carrying heavy loads on one shoulder (like carrying around your school bag)
  • Having a family history of progressive scoliosis

How to prevent Lumbar Progressive Scoliosis?

Progressive Scoliosis is an abnormal curvature of the spine that can lead to further deformity and pain. The condition may be present at birth, or it may develop over time due to injury or weakness in the spine. It can also be caused by a tumor in the spinal cord.

If you have Progressive Scoliosis, there are things you can do to help prevent it from worsening:

Exercise regularly

This will strengthen your core muscles and improve your posture, which will help alleviate pressure on your spine

Maintain proper spinal alignment

This means avoiding slouching! Practice sitting with good posture and standing tall with your shoulders back

Use support braces for scoliosis

They can help keep your spine straight while you’re sleeping or sitting down.

Recommended Exercise

Back

What are the exercises for Lumbar Progressive Scoliosis?

The exercises for Lumbar Progressive Scoliosis are: pelvic tilts, arm and leg raises.

Pelvic Tilts

Pelvic tilts are a good exercise to strengthen the muscles that support your spine and pelvis. They help keep the lumbar spine aligned and relieve pressure on the discs between vertebrae.

Lie on your back with your legs extended and arms at your sides. Squeeze your glutes (the muscles in the buttocks) and press your lower back into the floor. Hold for 5 seconds, relax for 5 seconds, then repeat 10 times.

Arm and Leg Raises

Arm and leg raises strengthen the abdominal muscles, which help stabilize your lower back.

Lift both legs off of the floor as high as you can without bending at the waist or raising your head off of the ground. Hold that position for 5 seconds before returning both legs back to their original position. Repeat 10 times.

What are the treatments for Lumbar Progressive Scoliosis?

There are several different types of treatments for progressive scoliosis, including:

Bracing

Bracing is a treatment that involves wearing a brace that can be adjusted as your spine changes. The brace provides support for your back and keeps it from bending too far to the side.

Surgery

Surgery may be an option if you have severe progressive scoliosis. It involves removing part of one or more vertebrae in your back so that they no longer curve.

Explanation of Recommended Orthotic Device

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What brace is used for Lumbar Progressive Scoliosis?

The TLSO is a brace that is used for patients with Lumbar Progressive Scoliosis.

The TLSO is a type of orthosis that provides support for the spine and helps prevent further spinal deformity. It is typically worn during the day, and may be worn at night as well.

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