Ligamentous Laxity

Ligamentous Laxity

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Ligamentous Laxity

General Condition

What is Ligamentous Laxity?

Ligamentous laxity is a condition that occurs when the ligaments in your joints don’t have enough elasticity to keep them stable. This means that when you move, they don’t have enough tension to keep your bones from moving around too much.

You might have heard this called hypermobile joints, and it’s common in people who are very flexible. But even if you’re not super bendy, if you’ve had a lot of injuries or surgeries in the same joint, it can also cause ligamentous laxity.

How does Ligamentous laxity occur?

Ligamentous laxity is when your joints are hypermobile. This means that they move more than they should, which can lead to joint pain and injuries.

The reason this happens is because your ligaments are loose and overly stretchy. Loose ligaments allow your joints to move in directions they shouldn’t be able to move in, which can cause damage over time.

What are the types of Ligamentous laxity?

Ligamentous laxity is a condition that results in the ligaments being too loose, which can lead to instability.

There are four main types of ligamentous laxity

  • Congenital Laxity
  • Acquired Laxity
  • Spontaneous Laxity
  • Traumatic Laxity

Congenital Laxity

Congenital laxity is a condition in which the ligaments are too loose. Congenital laxity occurs when the ligaments are chronically loose in the body and have been that way since birth. This type of laxity can be caused by a genetic defect or just a natural state of being.

Congenital laxity can cause problems like:

  • Trouble balancing yourself when you walk or run
  • Trouble doing activities that require strength and stability in your joints (like playing sports)

Acquired Laxity

Acquired laxity occurs when ligaments become loose due to injury or overuse. This can lead to several issues with the body, including instability and pain.

When you have acquired laxity, your ligaments become loose, which means they can’t hold your bones together as tightly as they should be held together. This can lead to pain and an increased risk of injury if you continue to use the affected joint.

This type of laxity is often seen in athletes who experience an increase in wear and tear on their joints over time.

Spontaneous Laxity

Spontaneous laxity occurs when there is no identifiable cause for the loosening of ligaments, though it may be associated with an injury.

The most common type of laxity is due to osteoarthritis, which causes the cartilage in a joint to break down over time. This can lead to inflammation and swelling around the joint, which ultimately leads to pain and loss of mobility.

Traumatic Laxity

Traumatic laxity is a condition that occurs when there has been an injury that has caused damage to one or more ligaments and they are now loose because of this damage.

The most common cause of traumatic laxity is a sports-related injury. Other kinds of injuries can also cause traumatic laxity, including car accidents and falls.

What are the causes of Ligamentous laxity?

The causes of ligamentous laxity are not well understood. They may include genes, injury to the joints or muscles, hormonal changes during pregnancy or puberty, overuse of a particular joint or muscle group, or having Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS), which is a genetic disorder characterized by overly loose joints and skin that bruises easily.

If you have ligamentous laxity, you may also experience pain when exercising or using certain muscles due to joint instability caused by muscle imbalance.

What are the symptoms of Ligamentous Laxity?

Loose ligaments can cause a number of symptoms, including:

  • Achilles tendonitis
  • Hamstring strains
  • Knee pain (especially after exercise)
  • Patellar tendonitis
  • Other common symptoms of ligamentous laxity, including:
  • Pain when you move your joint
  • A feeling that the joint is unstable or loose in its socket
  • Difficulty straightening or bending the joint with ease

How to prevent Ligamentous Laxity?

Loose ligaments are very common in people over 40 years old. They can also happen after an injury or surgery.

The best way to prevent ligamentous laxity is to maintain a healthy lifestyle and avoid injuries and surgeries as much as possible.

Recommended Exercise

General Condition

What are the treatments for Ligamentous Laxity?

The best treatment for ligamentous laxity depends on the severity of the symptoms and whether or not you want to correct them permanently (permanent treatment) or just temporarily (temporary treatment).

Permanent Treatment

Permanent treatment involves physical therapy, which helps strengthen the muscles around your joints to support them better and reduce pain and instability. You may also need surgery to tighten up your ligaments permanently.

Temporary Treatments

Temporary treatments include braces or splints to hold your joint together while it heals, injections into the joint that decrease swelling and inflammation, medications like ibuprofen or aspirin, and cortisone shots into the joint itself.

Explanation of Recommended Orthotic Device

General Condition

Related Device/Equipment

Orthomed Shoulder Brace

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