Ligament Reconstruction

Ligament Reconstruction

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Ligament Reconstruction

General Condition

What is Ligament Reconstruction?

Ligament reconstruction is a surgical procedure in which damaged ligaments are replaced with a graft. Ligament reconstruction can be used to treat several sports injuries, including ACL tears, meniscal tears, and labral tears.

What is a Ligament?

Ligaments are tough bands of connective tissue that connect bones to other bones in the body. They help stabilize joints and prevent excessive motion between the bones in the joint. When a ligament is torn or damaged beyond repair, it can cause instability at the joint—which means that your knee or hip might give out unexpectedly when you’re walking or running.

What is the purpose of Ligament Reconstruction?

A ligament reconstruction will replace the damaged ligament with an artificial one made from another part of your body or from donated tissue from another person (allograft).

The procedure can be used to treat instability and pain associated with torn ligaments, including the ACL (anterior cruciate ligament), PCL (posterior cruciate ligament), MCL (medial collateral ligament) and LCL (lateral collateral ligament).

What is Ligament Reconstruction of the knee?

Ligament reconstruction of the knee is a surgical procedure that replaces one or more torn ligaments in your knee.

The most commonly torn ligaments in the knee include:

ACL (anterior cruciate ligament)

PCL (posterior cruciate ligament)

MCL (medial collateral ligament)

LCL (lateral collateral ligament)

What are the types of  Ligament Reconstruction surgery for a knee?

The most common types of ligament reconstruction surgery for a knee are:

Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) Reconstruction

This is when one or both of your ACLs have been damaged or torn and need to be reconstructed. The ACLs are located inside your knee joint and help stabilize it. When you tear your ACL, it can be difficult to walk normally and even play sports.

Posterior Cruciate Ligament (PCL) Reconstruction

Your PCLs are located inside your knee joint and help keep your tibia from moving forward while keeping it stable at the same time. If one or both of your PCLs are damaged or torn, they can cause pain in your back leg that may get worse when you bend down or squat down low to pick something up off the floor.

Meniscus Tear Treatment

Meniscus tears occur when there is an injury to one or more of your medial or lateral menisci – which are cartilage discs found inside your knee joint that help absorb shock during physical activity such as walking or running. Meniscus tears can be treated with a brace and rest, or in more serious cases through surgery.

There are three main types of ligament reconstruction surgery for a knee:

Arthroscopic repair

The ligaments are repaired by a small incision in the knee joint. This procedure is usually done under general anesthesia and does not require a cast or brace after the surgery. However, it does take 3 to 6 months for full recovery because the joint is still unstable during this time.

Knee arthroplasty

The damaged ligament is removed and replaced with an artificial implant. This procedure allows the patient to recover more quickly than with arthroscopic repair because the joint is stabilized during surgery. However, it may be recommended only if there is severe damage or arthritis present in the knee joint.

Total knee replacement

If both cruciate ligaments are torn or if there is severe arthritis present in the knee joint, then total knee replacement may be recommended instead of arthroscopic or partial reconstruction.

What Causes Knee Ligament Reconstruction?

There are many reasons why you might need this procedure, including:

  • A tear in your ACL
  • A tear in your LCL or MCL
  • Trauma or injury to the knee
  • Infection in the knee joint
  • Tumors of the bone or soft tissue near the knee
  • Trauma to the joint, such as a fall or car accident
  • A chronic condition like rheumatoid arthritis or osteoarthritis
  • Overuse injuries caused by repetitive motions, like those seen in athletes who play certain sports

What is knee Ligament Repair?

Knee ligament repair is a surgical procedure that replaces torn ligaments with a graft. The graft is used to reconnect the knee joint, as well as to provide support for the knee. The most common types of grafts used are from the patient’s own body and from donated tissue.

The three most commonly used surgical techniques are:

Autograft – using tissue from your own body to repair your damaged ligament (the most common choice)

Allograft – using tissue from another person’s body to repair your damaged ligament (rarely used)

Xenograft – using tissue from an animal’s body to repair your injured ligament (rarely used)

Recommended Exercise

General Condition

Explanation of Recommended Orthotic Device

General Condition

What type of braces is recommended after Knee Ligament Construction?

After knee ligament reconstruction, a brace is recommended to protect the knee and prevent reinjury.

Functional braces are preferred. Functional braces provide support that is needed after a knee ligament reconstruction.

Functional Braces

There are different types of functional knee braces available. The most common type is an ACL brace, which stabilizes the injured knee joint and helps with the healing process. Knee braces are designed to protect your knee from further damage and maintain proper alignment as you go about your daily life. If you have been diagnosed with a torn ACL, MCL or LCL, it’s important to start wearing a functional brace as soon as possible so that you can begin recovering from your injury faster!

Knee straps

These are elastic bands that wrap around the front of your thigh just below your kneecap. They may be used for people who have torn the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) or medial collateral ligament (MCL).

Ankle foot orthoses (AFOs)

These are often recommended for people who have torn their ACL or MCL because they help stabilize the foot and protect it from turning inward during weight bearing activities such as walking or running; however, AFOs do not provide support for the knee joint itself so they will not prevent other injuries such as meniscus tears or cartilage damage that might occur when someone falls on their knees while wearing them!

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