Lateral Collateral Ligament Sprain

Lateral Collateral Ligament Sprain

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Lateral Collateral Ligament Sprain

Knee

What is Lateral Collateral Ligament Sprain?

The lateral collateral ligament (LCL) is the outermost ligament of the knee, running along the side of the knee joint. It connects the femur (thigh bone) to the fibula (smaller bone of lower leg). The LCL helps to stabilize and support the knee joint.

A sprain occurs when the ligament on the outer side of your knee is overstretched or torn. This can occur during a sports injury or other traumatic event that causes excessive stretching or tearing of one or more ligaments of your knee joint.

The LCL is one of four main ligaments in your knee and can be torn during sports activities or other physical activities that involve sudden changes in direction. A LCL sprain is often referred to as an “unstable” injury because it can cause instability or give way in your knee, which can lead to further injury if not treated properly.

What are the types of Lateral Collateral Ligament Sprain?

Lateral collateral ligament (LCL) sprains are classified by their severity, and they can range from Grade 1 (mild) to Grade 3 (severe).

Grade 1 Lateral Collateral Ligament Sprain

A Grade 1 sprain is characterized by pain, tenderness, and swelling in the outer side of the knee without instability. The LCL can be tested for function by standing on one leg and moving forward and backward. If there is pain when the knee is bent inward, it indicates that the ligament has been torn.

Grade 2 Lateral Collateral Ligament Sprain

 A Grade 2 sprain is characterized by pain, tenderness, and swelling in the outer side of the knee with some instability. There may be some popping or grinding when a stress test is performed. The LCL can be tested for function by standing on one leg and moving forward and backward. If there is pain when the knee is bent inward, it indicates that the ligament has been torn.

Grade 3 Lateral Collateral Ligament Sprain

A Grade 3 Lateral Collateral Ligament Sprain is a serious injury that involves complete tearing of one or more of your lateral collateral ligaments. This can result in severe instability of the knee joint and may require surgery to repair it properly.

What are the causes of Lateral Collateral Ligament Sprain?

LCL sprains are common in football players, soccer players and basketball players because these sports involve sudden stops and starts that put extra stress on the knees. A player may also sustain an LCL sprain if he or she falls onto an outstretched knee.

The most common cause of this type of knee injury is when the outside of your knee is overstretched while you’re running or jumping. This can happen if your foot lands awkwardly or if you land on uneven ground, causing your foot to twist inward as you land.

Other causes of LCL sprain include:

  • An injury to the outside of your knee, like a fall onto an outstretched hand or twisting your knee during running or jumping sports
  • Repeated stress on one side of the knee from activities such as skiing or cycling
  • A direct blow to the outside of your knee

What are the symptoms of Lateral Collateral Ligament Sprain?

Symptoms of a lateral collateral ligament sprain include pain, swelling, bruising and stiffness in your knee joint. Some people also experience instability in their knees—the feeling that their leg will give out when they walk—which causes them to limp or favor one leg over another.

Other symptoms include:

  • Pain on the outer side of your knee, which may be more prominent when you bend your knee
  • Swelling around your knee joint (if there is a lot of inflammation)
  • A popping sound or feeling heard when injured

How to prevent Lateral Collateral Ligament Sprain?

The best way to prevent this injury is to warm up before exercise, strengthen your muscles around your knees, and stretch properly before and after exercising. When exercising outdoors, wear shoes with good support and avoid surfaces that are slippery or uneven.

If you’ve experienced a lateral collateral ligament sprain, here are some ways to prevent it from happening again:

  • Wear proper shoes with good arch support and shock absorption.
  • If you’re going to be jumping or running in high heels, wear flats instead.
  • Don’t go against your body’s natural tendency to turn outwards when you’re running—it can cause stress on the lateral side of your knee and lead to injury.

Recommended Exercise

Knee

What are the treatments for Lateral collateral ligament sprain?

The treatment for a lateral collateral ligament sprain depends on how severe it is and whether there is any other damage to your knee.

If you have minor sprains, your doctor may recommend rest and ice packs to help relieve any pain and swelling in your knee. You may also need to wear a brace for several weeks after the injury.

Possible treatments for a lateral collateral ligament sprain include:

  • Resting and icing the swollen area to reduce pain, swelling, and inflammation.
  • Using crutches to help with weight bearing until swelling subsides and walking becomes easier.
  • Using braces such as an air cast or knee brace to stabilize your knee while it heals.

Explanation of Recommended Orthotic Device

Knee

What type of braces are used for Lateral collateral ligament sprain?

The knee brace you use depends on your injury, but there are two types of braces that are often prescribed for lateral collateral ligament sprains:

Hinged-knee braces

Non-hinged knee braces

Hinged-knee braces are usually made of plastic, rubber, or metal and they have hinges at the top and bottom of the brace. When you bend your knee, the hinges move along with your leg to provide support while allowing some flexibility in other positions—like when walking around or sitting down.

Non-hinged knee braces are generally made of leather or fabric, depending on what works best for each patient’s needs. They’re designed to stay in place when bent but not when straightened out completely (so no bending over with these!).

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