Lateral Collateral Ligament Injury

Lateral Collateral Ligament Injury

VIEW DETAILS

Recommended Exercise

VIEW EXERCISE DETAILS

Orthotic Device And Benefits

VIEW DETAILS

Related Device/Equipment

Orthomed Shoulder Brace

$ 280.00

Orthomed Shoulder Brace

$ 280.00

Orthomed Shoulder Brace

$ 280.00

Orthomed Shoulder Brace

$ 280.00

VIEW ALL PRODUCTS

Lateral Collateral Ligament Injury

Knee

What is Lateral Collateral Ligament Injury?

A lateral collateral ligament injury is a tear of the ligament that runs along the outside of your knee. This ligament helps stabilize your knee joint and keep it from moving too far to either side.

It prevents your kneecap from sliding too far to the side. If you injure this ligament, it can cause pain and swelling in your knee, especially when you bend or straighten your leg.

What are the types of Lateral Collateral Ligament Injury?

There are three grades of lateral collateral ligament injuries:

Grade 1 ACL injury: A minor tear that does not affect your movement or stability.

Grade 2 ACL injury: A partial tear that has some effect on your movement or stability. You may need to avoid certain activities that put strain on this area of your knee.

Grade 3 ACL injury: A complete tear with no stability in this area of your knee.

What are the risk factors for developing Lateral Collateral Ligament Injury?

A lateral collateral ligament injury occurs when there is too much stress placed on this ligament during physical activity, which can cause it to stretch or tear. Risk factors include:

  1. Excessive turning or pivoting
  2. Having a weak core muscle group (abdominal muscles)
  3. Having weak hips or poor hip flexibility
  4. Having weak calf muscles
  5. Being overweight or obese

What are the causes of Lateral Collateral Ligament Injury?

A LCL injury occurs when you tear or overstretch this ligament. This can happen when you rotate your foot inward or outward, rotate your knee inward or outward, or bend your knee too far backward or forward.

The most common causes of a LCL sprain are:

  • Twisting movements while playing sports like soccer, basketball, football and skiing
  • A direct blow to the knee that causes the knee to bend or rotate in an unnatural way
  • A sudden change in direction when running or jumping
  • Landing on an unstable surface with your feet together and knees bent, such as a bench or chair.

What are the symptoms of Lateral Collateral Ligament Injury?

The three main symptoms of LCL injury are:

  • Pain on the outside of the knee or thigh when you bend or straighten your leg
  • Inability to fully extend your leg (straighten it) without pain
  • A feeling of instability in your knee when you try to walk
  • Bruising on the outside of your knee
  • Tenderness when pressing on the outside of your knee
  • Stiffness in your knee
  • Limited range of motion in the kne
  • A popping or clicking sound when moving the joint
  • Redness around the joint (bruising)

How to prevent Lateral Collateral Ligament Injury?

To prevent Lateral Collateral Ligament Injury, you need to be careful with your knee. You should not move it too much or in a way that is too extreme. You also need to avoid any type of twisting motion. If you feel pain or stiffness in your knee, then you should get treatment from a doctor.

Here are some ways to prevent LCL injuries:

  • Warm up before playing sports or exercising.
  • Stretch your legs before you start playing sports or exercising.
  • Use proper footwear when playing sports or exercising.
  • Do not participate in contact sports if you have an LCL injury or have had an LCL injury in the past.

Recommended Exercise

Knee

What are the treatments for Lateral Collateral Ligament Injury?

Treatments for a Lateral Collateral Ligament Injury can vary depending on the severity of the injury. In most cases, a doctor will recommend that you rest the joint and avoid any activities that put pressure on that area. You may also be prescribed medications to help with pain and inflammation. If the injury is severe enough, surgery may be needed to repair the ligament damage.

The most common treatment for a lateral collateral ligament injury is rest, ice, compression and elevation (RICE). This means resting the injured area as much as possible, applying ice to reduce swelling and inflammation, applying compression wraps to keep swelling down and elevating your leg above heart level if possible to reduce swelling.

Other treatment options for Lateral Collateral Ligament Injury include:

  • Resting and icing the injured knee for two to three days
  • Wearing an elastic bandage or brace for six weeks to support the injured ligament during recovery
  • Working with a physical therapist to strengthen other muscles in your leg so that they can take over some of the work done by your ACL until it has healed.

Explanation of Recommended Orthotic Device

Knee

What type of brace is used for ACL injuries?

A hinged knee brace is used for Lateral Collateral Ligament Injury.

The hinged knee brace helps to support the knee, which reduces pain and swelling caused by Lateral Collateral Ligament Injury. This type of brace can help you recover from an ACL tear by providing support for your knee while it heals. A hinged knee brace also helps prevent other injuries to your leg such as a hamstring injury or shin splints.

Related Device/Equipment

Orthomed Shoulder Brace

$ 280.00

Orthomed Shoulder Brace

$ 280.00

Orthomed Shoulder Brace

$ 280.00

Orthomed Shoulder Brace

$ 280.00

Request Referral

Specialist Type:

Insurance Type:

Upload Referral Document:

Share

Send by: