Knee Instability

Knee Instability

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Knee Instability

Knee

What is knee instability?

KNEE

Knee instability is a condition that affects the knee joint and can lead to pain, discomfort, and other problems. The knee joint is made up of three bones: the femur (thighbone), patella (kneecap), and tibia (shinbone). There are also two ligaments that connect these bones together: the medial collateral ligament (MCL) and lateral collateral ligament (LCL).

What’s the role of MCL and LCL in knee instability?

The MCL helps keep your knee stable by preventing it from bending too far inward or outward. The LCL helps keep your knee stable by preventing it from bending too far backward or forward. When one or both ligaments are damaged or weakened, they cannot provide proper support for your knee anymore which can cause instability in the joint.

Knee Instability can cause pain, swelling and stiffness in the joint area. There are several causes for Knee instability including injury or trauma to the knee joint, arthritis (inflammation), an infection within the joint space or surrounding tissues, or congenital defects like loose ligaments or bones (also known as dysplasia).

What are the Types of knee instability?

Knee instability is a condition that affects the knee’s ability to function properly. There are several types of knee instability, including:

Acute anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury

This type of injury occurs when the ACL is torn due to excessive stress on the joint or sudden twisting, as in a car accident.

Chronic ACL injury

A chronic ACL injury occurs when there is damage to the ligament over time, such as from repetitive strain during sports or exercise.

Patellar dislocation

This type of instability occurs when the kneecap (patella) moves out of its normal position and rests on top of the knee joint instead of underneath it.


What are the causes of Knee Instability?

The most common cause of knee instability is a torn ACL (anterior cruciate ligament). The ACL connects the femur (thigh bone) to the tibia (shin bone) and helps stabilize the knee joint. If this ligament is injured, it can put stress on other parts of your knee and make it unstable.

Common causes include:

Some other causes of knee instability include:

Torn meniscus:

This is a cartilage in your knee joint that helps cushion your bones during movement. Torn meniscus often occurs after an injury such as falling or twisting while playing sports. They are also more common in people who are overweight or have arthritis in their knees because cartilage wears down more easily in these conditions.

Torn hamstring tendon:

A hamstring tendon connects muscles in your thigh to bone at the top of your shin bone just above where it attaches to your lower leg bone (tibia). A torn hamstring tendon can be caused by a sudden movement, such as running while wearing high heels or kicking a soccer ball too hard. It can also occur during physical activity that involves rapid acceleration, such as sprinting or jumping rope.

Injuries like ACL tears, meniscus tears, and other ligament injuries can cause the knee joint to become unstable. So can arthritis, which causes the cartilage in your knee to wear away. Some people have congenital issues with their knees that make them more prone to injury or instability.

What are the symptoms of Knee instability?

The symptoms of knee instability include:

-pain in the joint that worsens with activity, especially twisting motions

-feeling like your knee is “giving out” when walking or running

  • A popping sound when moving your knee
  • Having trouble standing on one leg for more than 10 seconds
  • Unusual pain in your knee
  • Trouble squatting or kneeling without pain
  • Inability to stand up straight when you’re walking or running
  • Tingling or numbness in the leg
  • Loss of sensation
  • Weakness in the leg
  • Severe pain in the leg

These symptoms can be caused by a number of things, including:

Injury to the menisci (the cartilage pads between your femur and tibia).

Dislocation of the patella (kneecap), which can cause pain and swelling.

Loose bodies in the knee joint that can cause pain and swelling.

What are the effects of Knee Instability?

The effects of knee instability can vary depending on the severity of the condition and how long you’ve had it.

Mild instability may only cause some discomfort when walking downstairs or running on uneven ground, while severe instability may make it difficult for you to walk at all without an assistive device such as crutches or a cane.

Knee instability can lead to other problems as well, including:

  • Tendinitis (a painful inflammation of the tendons around your knee joint)
  • Meniscus tear (a tear in one of your cartilage discs)
  • Fracture (a broken bone)

How to prevent Knee Instability?

There are a few ways to prevent knee instability.

First, it’s important to strengthen the muscles around your knees. This will help support your knees and prevent them from giving way.

Second, it’s important to keep your body weight in check. Excess weight puts an extra strain on the knees and can lead to instability issues over time.

Third, if you have flat feet or high arches, consider wearing shoes with good arch support. This can help keep your ankles stable as well as keep your hips aligned properly which can reduce stress on the knees.

Finally, avoid high impact activities such as running or jumping as much as possible until after you’ve addressed any underlying causes for your instability issues so that you don’t make things worse!

Recommended Exercise

Knee

What are the treatments for Knee Instability?

Treatment for knee instability is typically determined by the underlying cause of the instability.

If your knee is unstable because of a ligament injury, you’ll likely need to have surgery to repair or reattach the damaged ligament. If your knee is unstable due to muscle weakness, you may be able to strengthen your muscles through physical therapy to help improve stability.

If you have patellar tendonitis, treatment may include rest and ice and anti-inflammatory medication. Surgery may also be required if other treatments fail to relieve symptoms or if they become too severe.

If you have recently injured your knee or have been diagnosed with patellofemoral arthritis, it’s likely that you have some degree of instability. This means that your kneecap (patella) moves from side to side in the groove where it sits under your thigh bone (femur). The condition usually affects middle-aged people and those who participate in sports that require a lot of jumping and pivoting—such as basketball or football—though anyone can develop it over time.

Explanation of Recommended Orthotic Device

Knee

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