Knee Fracture

Knee Fracture

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Recommended Exercise

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Orthotic Device And Benefits

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Knee Fracture

Knee

What is Knee Fracture?

Knee fractures are also known as knee dislocations. These fractures can occur when the knee joint is suddenly bent in a way that it shouldn’t be. This causes the tibia to break and move out of place, which then causes pain and swelling.

The most common site for knee fractures is the tibial plateau, which is located along the shinbone (tibia).

What are the types of Knee Fractures?

The most common type of fracture is a “buckle” fracture, which occurs when a small piece of bone breaks off from the main part of the bone.

Knee fractures can be either “open” or “closed.” An open fracture is an injury in which a bone breaks through the skin. A closed fracture is an injury in which there is no break in the skin.

There are five types of knee fractures: Comminuted, displaced, open, stable, and stress fractures.

Comminuted Knee Fracture

This is a break in the bone that causes it to separate into several pieces. A comminuted fracture typically requires surgery to repair it.

Displaced Knee Fracture

In this type of fracture, the broken parts move out of alignment with each other and cannot be realigned without surgery. A displaced fracture occurs when the broken bone is pushed out of its normal position in the joint.

Open Knee Fracture

This type of injury involves a wound that extends through the skin and into the underlying tissues where there is bleeding. An open fracture is a serious injury that involves an open wound on the skin overlying a broken bone. Open fractures can be life threatening because they increase the risk for infection and other complications related to the trauma. Open fractures usually require surgery to fix them.

Stable Knee Fracture

A stable fracture does not move around within the joint, but it may still cause pain and problems with function if it’s near a nerve or blood vessel.

In this injury, the broken parts remain in alignment but may require surgical intervention later on if they begin to shift around or cause problems with movement.

Stress Fracture

Stress fractures are tiny cracks in bones caused by repetitive stress on muscles, tendons, ligaments, or bones themselves. They can develop after strenuous activities like running or playing sports like tennis or basketball.

These types of injuries occur when repeated stress causes tiny cracks in bone tissue which can lead to pain and swelling over time if not treated properly.

How to diagnose Knee Fracture?

Knee Fracture is a condition characterized by the break of the bone in the knee joint. The most common cause of this injury is trauma to the knee. There are several ways to diagnose Knee Fracture. These include:

X-rays – An X-ray can help determine if there has been a fracture, but it cannot tell exactly what type of fracture it is.

MRI – This test will show whether there is a fracture and which type of fracture it is. It may also detect other problems such as tears in ligaments or cartilage damage.

What are the symptoms of Knee Fracture?

Knee Fracture is a break in the bone of the knee. The most common cause is a direct blow to the knee, which can happen during sports or even in an accident, such as a car crash.

The symptoms of Knee Fracture include:

  • Pain at the time of injury.
  • Swelling around the injured area (indicative of bleeding inside).
  • A deformity in the limb (the injured area looks out of shape).

What are the causes of Knee Fracture?

There are many causes of Knee Fracture. The most common cause of Knee Fracture is a fall, which causes the bone to break due to the sudden impact. Other causes include:

  • A car accident
  • A sports injury (such as playing football or soccer)
  • A slip or trip on stairs or uneven ground

What are the risk factors for Knee Fracture?

The most common risk factor is osteoporosis, or having low bone mass. Other risk factors include:

  • Being older than 65 years old
  • Having a high level of estrogen in the body (for women), which can be caused by taking birth control pills or after menopause
  • Having a low level of calcium in the blood
  • Having a history of previous fractures due to osteoporosis

Recommended Exercise

Knee

What are the exercises for Knee Fracture?

Knee Bending

To strengthen the muscles around your knee and improve range of motion, try doing knee bends several times a day.

Bend your knee as far as it will go without pain and hold for 30 seconds, then repeat 10 times. This exercise can be done lying down or sitting up with your leg supported by pillows or towels.

Quadriceps Stretch

This exercise will help you improve your knee strength and flexibility.

The stretch involves laying on your back and reaching towards your right foot with both hands while keeping your left leg straight on the floor. Hold this position for 30 seconds before switching sides and repeating again with the other leg.

What are the treatments for Knee Fracture?

The treatment for any broken bone depends on how bad the fracture is and how it affects the person’s daily life.

The most common treatments for Knee Fracture include:

Cast or Splint

A cast or splint is an external support that holds your fractured bones in place while they heal. It may take anywhere from six weeks to six months for your bones to fully heal after a fracture. A cast or splint will be used until your doctor says you can stop using it.

Crutch

Crutches are another option to help you walk while recovering from a fracture. You can use crutches until your doctor says its OK to stop using them, which could take anywhere from three weeks to three months after surgery depending on how well your bones heal during that time period.”

Explanation of Recommended Orthotic Device

Knee

What brace is used for Knee Fracture?     

Knee fractures are not uncommon, and if you have suffered one, your doctor may have recommended that you wear a KAFO (knee-ankle-foot orthosis) fracture brace.

This is an external device that helps stabilize and immobilize the knee joint. It’s designed to reduce pain and swelling, as well as improve your ability to perform daily activities.

KAFOs have been shown to be very effective at reducing pain, swelling and improving range of motion in patients with knee fractures and dislocations.

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