Herniated Disc

Herniated disc

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Recommended Exercise

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Orthotic Device And Benefits

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Herniated disc

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What is Herniated Disc?

Herniated disc, also known as a slipped disc, is a condition in which the soft gel-like center of an intervertebral disc protrudes through a tear in the outer ring. The protruded portion of the disc can compress or irritate nerves and cause pain, numbness and muscle weakness.

Herniated discs are common among people age 50 and older. In some cases, they can cause serious complications if not treated properly.

What are the types of Herniated Disc?

There are three types of herniated discs: contained, non-contained and sequestered.

Contained Herniation (Protrusion)

This is the most common type of herniated disc. It is also known as a contained or extruded disc. This type of herniation occurs when the disc bulges outwards but does not push on the spinal cord or nerve roots.

Non-Contained Herniation (Disc Extrusion)

This type occurs when the disc bulges outwards and presses on the spinal cord or nerve roots. The most common types of non-contained herniations are central canal stenosis and foraminal stenosis.

Sequestered herniations

Sequestered herniations occur when the entire disc ruptures and shifts into another part of your body like your spinal cord or muscles. This can cause severe pain that radiates down into your arms or legs but not up into your neck or back.

This also occurs when there is a fragment of bone or cartilage that becomes trapped inside a bony canal.

How to diagnose Herniated Disc?

Herniated Disc is a common spinal condition which affects millions of people worldwide. This condition is caused by the bulging or rupturing of the inner part of your spinal disc and can cause intense pain, numbness and weakness in your back and limbs.

Herniated Disc can be diagnosed by using imaging tests such as X-ray or MRI scan to check for areas of increased pressure within the spine.

What are the symptoms of Herniated Disc?

The most common symptom of a herniated disc is back pain that gets worse when you’re active and better when you rest. You might feel burning or shooting pain in your legs, numbness or weakness in your legs, or pain that spreads to your abdomen or groin. You may also have muscle spasms or stiffness in your neck and shoulders. The pain may radiate down one leg or both legs at once.

Other symptoms can include:

  • Changes in bowel function like constipation or diarrhea
  • Numbness in the arms and hands
  • Loss of bladder control (incontinence)
  • Pain that radiates into your chest area (pleurisy)

What are the causes of Herniated Disc?

The most common cause of herniated disc is wear and tear from aging. As you get older, your spine loses some of its elasticity and discs can begin to break down. This can result in tiny cracks or tears in the outer ring (annulus) of the disc that allow some of its gel-like center to leak out and put pressure on surrounding nerves.

Other possible causes include:

  • Injury – A blow to the back or side of your neck could cause one or more discs to rupture and press against nearby nerve roots;
  • Trauma – Injuries such as those caused by car accidents or falls can damage discs or vertebrae;
  • Poor posture – Slouching or sitting with poor posture increases pressure on discs, causing them to bulge;
  • Heavy lifting – Lifting heavy items like furniture strains back muscles, which pull on spinal structures

What are the risk factors for Herniated Disc?

The most important risk factor for a herniated disc is age. As we get older, our bodies become more prone to degeneration and wear and tear. This can cause discs to herniate or bulge out of place, especially if they were already weak or compromised to begin with.

Other risk factors include:

  • Sedentary lifestyle
  • Poor posture
  • Excessive exercise
  • Obesity

Recommended Exercise

Back

What are the exercises for Herniated Disc?

There are a number of exercises that can help with Herniated Disc. Here are some of the most effective ones:

Neck stretches

Neck stretches can help improve the range of motion in your neck and reduce the pain associated with Herniated Disc.

To do this, simply pull your head back and hold for 30 seconds. Repeat 5 times.

Neck retraction (chin tuck)

This exercise will help strengthen your neck muscles and reduce pain caused by Herniated Disc.

Place your fingers under the chin and pull your head back slowly until you feel a stretch in the front of your neck. Hold for 5 seconds. Repeat 10 times on both sides of your neck.

Shoulder retraction

This exercise works to strengthen the muscles around your shoulder blade which can help relieve pain caused by Herniated Disc.

Stand with good posture and roll your shoulders back as far as possible without arching or rotating them forward. Hold for 5 seconds. Repeat 10 times on both sides of your body.

Isometric hold

Isometric holds are another good way to relieve pain caused by herniated discs in the neck or back.

To perform an isometric hold, simply contract your abdominal muscles as hard as you can for five seconds and then relax for five seconds before repeating again. Do this ten times per set and complete three sets per session each day

What are the treatments for Herniated Disc?

There are a few treatments for herniated disc. One of the most common is physical therapy.

Physical therapy helps patients to strengthen muscles and increase flexibility in order to reduce pain.

Doctors may also prescribe medications or injections to help manage the pain. Surgery may be an option for some people with herniated discs, however, it is usually reserved for cases that do not improve with conservative treatments.

Explanation of Recommended Orthotic Device

Back

What brace is used for Herniated Disc?

A lumbar sacral orthosis (LSO) is a type of brace that is used to help stabilize the lower spine in cases of herniated discs. The LSO has been shown to be effective for this purpose and is often prescribed for people who have undergone back surgery.

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