Glenohumeral Dislocation

Glenohumeral Dislocation

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Recommended Exercise

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Orthotic Device And Benefits

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Glenohumeral Dislocation

Shoulder

What is Glenohumeral Dislocation?

Glenohumeral dislocation is a condition that occurs when the ball-and-socket joint at the top of your arm becomes separated from the shoulder blade. This separation can be partial or complete, and it causes pain and swelling in your shoulder. The condition is also known as an “out-of-place shoulder.”

Symptoms include pain in your shoulder and arm, swelling, bruising and decreased range of motion (ROM) of the shoulder.

What are the types of Glenohumeral Dislocation?

There are two types of Glenohumeral Dislocation: Anterior and Posterior.

Anterior Dislocation

Anterior dislocation occurs when the ball (head of the humerus) dislocates forward, away from its socket (glenoid). It can be further classified as Bankart Lesion or SLAP Lesion.

  • Bankart Lesions occur when there is an injury to the glenoid labrum or ligament. This results in a tear that can prevent the head of the humerus from staying secure in its socket.
  • SLAP Lesions occur when there is an injury to the superior glenohumeral ligament, anterior capsule, and posterior capsule around the shoulder joint. This can also cause instability and pain around the joint.

Posterior Dislocation

Posterior dislocation occurs when the ball (head of the humerus) dislocates backward into its socket (glenoid). This type of dislocation is less common than anterior dislocation but can still cause serious damage if left untreated.

What are the causes of Glenohumeral Dislocation?

Glenohumeral Dislocation is a condition in which the humeral head (ball) and glenoid (socket) of your shoulder joint separate, causing your arm to come out of its socket. This is a common condition among adults who play sports that involve throwing or catching, such as baseball and softball.

If you’ve had this condition before, you may be at risk for it again if you continue playing those sports. However, Glenohumeral Dislocation can also occur without any prior history of dislocation.

The causes of Glenohumeral Dislocation vary depending on the person and their circumstances. Sometimes it occurs for no apparent reason. Other times it’s caused by an injury to the shoulder joint or muscles in the area that support the joint.

What are the symptoms of Glenohumeral Dislocation?

Glenohumeral Dislocation can occur when the head of the humerus (upper arm bone) moves out of the glenoid (socket) in your shoulder.

There are many symptoms that can accompany a dislocated shoulder, including:

  • Pain in the joint, particularly with movement
  • Swelling and bruising
  • Loss of range of motion
  • Loss of strength and control over your arm

What are the risk factors for Glenohumeral Dislocation?

The risk factors for glenohumeral dislocation include the following:

  1. A previous history of shoulder dislocation
  2. A history of shoulder injury or instability, such as a sprain or ligament tear
  3. A family history of glenohumeral dislocation
  4. Hypermobility of the joint (joint movement beyond normal ranges)

Recommended Exercise

Shoulder

What are the exercises for Glenohumeral Dislocation?

The best exercises for a Glenohumeral Dislocation are those that will help you regain your range of motion and strengthen the muscles around your shoulder.

To regain your range of motion, try gentle stretches that focus on bringing your arm up to 90 degrees as well as down to your side. Hold each stretch for 20 seconds, and do three repetitions per day.

To strengthen your shoulder muscles, try these exercises:

Shoulder Press

Sit or stand with good posture and keep your arms at your sides. Slowly lift one arm straight in front of you until it’s level with the other arm, then lower gently back to the starting position. This is one rep! Do 10 reps on each arm, three times per day.

Rows

Stand with good posture and keep your feet hip-width apart. Lift one dumbbell in front of you so that its handle is parallel to the floor and hold it close to one shoulder; then pull it toward that shoulder until it touches (or almost touches) there—but don’t let go yet! From here, slowly lower back down to starting position; repeat on other side; continue alternating until 10 reps are complete on each side (30 totals).

What are the treatments for Glenohumeral Dislocation?

The treatments for Glenohumeral Dislocation depend on the severity of the condition.

  • If you have a mild dislocation, your doctor may recommend that you rest the shoulder and wear a sling to immobilize it. You may also be given an elastic bandage to put over your arm, which can help to reduce swelling and pain.
  • If you have moderate or severe dislocation, then you will likely need surgery to restore normal function of your shoulder joint. Surgery involves repositioning your humerus bone back into the socket. The procedure is performed under general anesthesia and takes about an hour. After surgery, you will need to wear a sling for about two weeks while your incision heals.

Explanation of Recommended Orthotic Device

Shoulder

What brace is used for Glenohumeral Dislocation?

Dynamic brace and Sling-Knee-Chest brace are used for Glenohumeral Dislocation.

Dynamic brace is used in the treatment of shoulder injuries, such as dislocation and subluxation. It is also used to treat shoulder instability and to help support injured ligaments. The dynamic brace is designed to support the shoulder during movement, while allowing it to move freely during non-weight bearing activities.

The Sling-Knee-Chest brace is used in the treatment of shoulder injuries, such as dislocation and subluxation. It is also used to treat shoulder instability and to help support injured ligaments. The Sling-Knee-Chest brace is designed to support the shoulder during movement, while allowing it to move freely during non-weight bearing activities.

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Orthomed Shoulder Brace

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Orthomed Shoulder Brace

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Orthomed Shoulder Brace

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Orthomed Shoulder Brace

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