Equinovarus Deformity

Equinovarus Deformity

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Recommended Exercise

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Orthotic Device And Benefits

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Equinovarus Deformity

Foot

What is Equinovarus Deformity?

Equinovarus deformity, also known as “clubfoot” or “Clayton’s foot”, is a condition in which the affected foot has an inward-turning of the great toe and its neighboring toes.

The condition is usually caused by an imbalance in the muscles controlling the ankle and foot. It can also be caused by a birth defect, or by an injury to the knee or hip that affects how those joints work together.

The deformity is usually caused by an injury to the lower leg bone (tibia) or muscles that attach to it. The injury may occur while playing sports or during an accident. It can also result from birth defects or genetic disorders such as Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

What are the types of Equinovarus Deformity?

There are two types of Equinovarus Deformity, which is a condition in which the foot is turned inward toward the other foot.

1. Talipes calcaneovalgus

In this form of equinovarus deformity, both ankles are dorsiflexed (pointing upward) and the forefoot deviated outward.

2. Talipes calcaneovarus

In this form of equinovarus deformity, one ankle is dorsiflexed and the other ankle is in plantar flexion (pointing downward). The forefoot deviated inward on the plantar-flexed side and outward on the dorsiflexed side

What are the causes of Equinovarus Deformity?

Most cases of equinovarus deformity are caused by a combination of genetics and environmental factors, including:

  • Being born with one leg shorter than the other (a condition called “asymmetrical growth”)
  • Having very high arches in your feet, which means that your feet tend to roll inward when you walk or stand up
  • Being born with flat feet that don’t have enough arch support
  • Incorrect positioning during birth
  • Painful muscle spasms that can lead to abnormal positioning of the feet, ankles and knees
  • Trauma to the foot or ankle

What are the symptoms of Equinovarus Deformity?

The main symptom is a clubfoot that grows inward and downward, and can cause pain when walking or running. Other symptoms may include:

  • Discomfort or pain in the foot
  • A calloused appearance of the sole of the foot
  • Limited range of motion in the ankle
  • Pain while walking or running, especially on uneven surfaces
  • A bent knee and foot that points outward
  • A rigid, stiff leg that is straight only at the hip and ankle
  • Difficulty walking and getting your foot to touch the ground when you stand up

What are the risk factors for Equinovarus Deformity?

Risk factors for Equinovarus Deformity include:

  • Limb length differences (they affect more than one limb)
  • Genetic disorders, like Achondroplasia, which is the most common type of dwarfism
  • Tumors that are located in your spine or nervous system
  • Fractures or arthritis that are located in your spine or hip area

Recommended Exercise

Foot

What are the exercises for Equinovarus Deformity?

It’s important to remember that Equinovarus Deformity is a progressive deformity, so it is important to keep up with the exercises in order to slow down the progression of the condition.

There are three primary exercises you should consider: Dorsiflexion, External Rotation, and Stroking. These exercises can be done at home or in a gym.

Dorsiflexion

This involves moving your ankle towards your shin by bending it up towards you. This should be done at least 1-2 times per day for 5-10 minutes at a time.

External Rotation

Using an elastic band or cable pulley system, you can perform external rotation by standing on one leg and rotating your foot outwards as far as possible with the other leg straight on the ground. Perform this exercise 1-2 times per day for 5-10 minutes at a time.

Stroking

Start out with just one stroke before your workout session to warm up your body and increase blood flow throughout your body before going into more intense exercises like squats or deadlifts which require more muscle groups working together simultaneously (which could result in injury).

What are the treatments for Equinovarus Deformity?

There are a few ways you can treat this condition:

Exercises

A doctor will likely recommend exercises to strengthen your foot and ankle muscles. These exercises will help improve the way your foot and ankle move, which will help with any pain or discomfort caused by this problem.

Braces

Your doctor may also recommend wearing a brace or support for when you’re walking or running around. This helps keep your foot in its proper position so that it’s less likely to turn outwards while moving around during physical activity.

Orthotics

If these other treatments aren’t enough, then you might need to consider getting orthotics made specifically for Equinovarus Deformity (they’re called “orthoses”). These devices fit right into your shoes, which helps keep your foot from turning outwards while walking or running around—making it easier on your joints and helping reduce any pain caused by this condition!

Explanation of Recommended Orthotic Device

Back

What brace or orthotic is used for Equinovarus Deformity?

Foot abduction braces are the most common treatment for equinovarus deformity. These braces are custom-made to fit your child’s foot and leg, and they should be worn during all waking hours for at least three months.

These braces can be made from metal or plastic, but the plastic braces tend to be more comfortable for children. The brace is made from a firm material that keeps the feet from turning inwards when standing or walking. The brace also prevents your child’s foot from being raised up on the outside edge of their shoe when they walk.

The main goal of these braces is to keep your child’s feet straight while they are walking or standing upright until they get used to having their feet stay in an upright position all day long.

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