Dupuytren’s Contracture

Dupuytren's Contracture

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Recommended Exercise

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Orthotic Device And Benefits

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Dupuytren's Contracture

Hand

What is Dupuytren’s Contracture?

Dupuytren’s contracture is a disorder that causes the fingers and hands to become stiff, often in ways that make them difficult to straighten. It usually affects one hand more than the other, although both hands may be affected.

Dupuytren’s contracture can occur at any age, but most often it develops in people over the age of 50. It also tends to run in families.

What are the types of Dupuytren’s Contracture?

There are two types of Dupuytren’s Contracture:

Dupuytren’s contracture type 1, or palmar fibromatosis, is the most common form of Dupuytren’s Contracture. It occurs in both hands and affects the fascia, which is a connective tissue that binds muscles to bones.

The second type is Dupuytren’s contracture type 2, or digital fibromatosis. This form of Dupuytren’s Contracture only affects one hand and involves adhesion between the skin and underlying fascia.

What are the causes of Dupuytren’s Contracture?

There are several causes of Dupuytren’s contracture, but the most common cause is a genetic predisposition. Other possible causes include:

  • Radiation or chemotherapy treatment for cancer
  • Injury to the hand
  • Other diseases, including diabetes and lupus
  • Trauma, such as a car accident

What are the symptoms of Dupuytren’s Contracture?

Symptoms include:

  • Fingers bent into a claw-like position, often with stiffness and pain in the fingers and hands
  • A lump or thickened area on one or more fingers or hands (often at their base)
  • Tight cords under skin that can cause a nodule to form on your palm
  • Hand pain and stiffness
  • Tightening of the skin around your fingers and palm
  • Creased, thickened skin on the palm side of each finger (called palmar creases)

What are the risk factors for Dupuytren’s Contracture?

The risk factors for Dupuytren’s contracture include:

  • Age – Dupuytren’s contracture is most common in people over 40 years old.
  • Family history – If your parents or siblings have had Dupuytren’s contracture, you may be more likely to get it too.
  • Genetics – Some people inherit a genetic mutation that makes them more likely to develop Dupuytren’s contracture than others.

Recommended Exercise

Hand

What are the exercises for Dupuytren’s Contracture?

To help manage your Dupuytren’s contracture, we recommend the following exercises:

  1. Wrist extension

Stretch your hand back and hold for 5 seconds, then release. Repeat 10 times.

  1. Finger flexion

Bend your fingers toward your palm as far as you can without pain, hold for 5 seconds, and then release. Repeat 10 times.

  1. Wrist flexion

Bend your wrist downward until you feel a stretch in the palm of your hand; hold for 5 seconds and then release. Repeat 10 times.

What are the treatments for Dupuytren’s Contracture?

The standard treatment for Dupuytren’s contracture is surgery to remove the affected tissue. However, this can cause scarring and other complications, so some patients choose to avoid surgery and treat the condition with conservative measures instead.

Conservative treatments include:

  • Exercising regularly with your hand in a position that stretches out your fingers (this helps keep them straight)
  • Massaging your hands regularly with oil or cream to keep them flexible (you can also try soaking your hands in warm water)
  • Wearing splints at night while you sleep (these will keep your fingers straight while you’re sleeping)

Explanation of Recommended Orthotic Device

Hand

What brace is used for Dupuytren’s Contracture?

If you’re suffering from Dupuytren’s Contracture, you might be wondering what brace is best for you.

A medical-grade finger splint can be used to help keep your fingers straight, which can help prevent further contracture.

The finger splints are easy to put on and take off, and they come in different sizes to accommodate different finger lengths. They’re also adjustable so that they can be worn comfortably over long periods of time.

You should see a doctor before using a splint, but if your doctor approves, the splint can give you some relief from pain and discomfort caused by Dupuytren’s Contracture.

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