DIP Flexion Contracture

DIP Flexion Contracture

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Recommended Exercise

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Orthotic Device And Benefits

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DIP Flexion Contracture

Hand

What is DIP Flexion Contracture?

A flexion contracture is a deformity of the distal interphalangeal joint, or DIP joint. This joint connects your finger to your hand, and it’s made up of two bones: the proximal phalanx and the distal phalanx. The proximal phalanx is the bone closest to your hand, while the distal phalanx is the one farthest away from it. In order for you to bend your finger at this joint, these two bones need to move in opposite directions from one another—the proximal phalanx moves up as the distal phalanx moves down—which allows for flexion of your finger.

When you have a flexion contracture, however, this movement doesn’t occur properly because there’s a problem in one or both of these two bones’ structures: either they’re too short or too tight/narrow/dense (or all three). Because of this, when you try to bend your finger at its DIP joint, it won’t move very far before being stopped by something else—generally another bone or ligament in that area which has overgrown due to lack of use.

What are the types of DIP Flexion Contracture?

There are two main types of DIP Flexion Contracture:

1) Mild

When your doctor can still bend your finger at least 90 degrees, but it doesn’t straighten all the way when you try to extend it (straighten). This is called a ‘mild contracture’, and it’s usually caused by an injury that happened over time.

2) Severe

When your doctor can’t bend or straighten your finger at all because it’s stuck in a flexed position and won’t move. This type of contracture is rare and usually requires surgery to fix.

What are the causes of DIP Flexion Contracture?

This deformity can occur for many reasons, including injury, repetitive use, or genetics. If you have DIP Flexion Contracture, you will likely also have swan neck or boutonniere deformity, which is a similar condition that affects the top of your thumb. Swan neck deformities must be treated as a part of these deformities.

What are the symptoms of DIP Flexion Contracture?

Symptoms of DIP Flexion Contracture include:

  • Pain in the joint when you bend your finger to touch your palm, or pain when you extend your finger
  • Swelling of the joint
  • Tenderness at the base of your finger where it meets your palm
  • Stiffness in your finger

What are the risk factors for DIP Flexion Contracture?

The risk factors for DIP Flexion Contracture include:

  • A history of repetitive trauma to the finger, such as typing or playing a musical instrument
  • A family history of Dupuytren’s contracture (this is a genetic disorder that causes contractures in the hands)
  • Being overweight
  • Prolonged use of the affected finger(s)
  • Repeated trauma to the affected finger(s)

Recommended Exercise

Hand

What are the exercises for DIP Flexion Contracture?

The exercises for DIP Flexion Contracture are:

1. Finger Extension

This is one of the most common exercises for DIP flexion contracture. Lie down on your back and extend your hand towards a wall. Once you have reached the wall, slowly bring your hand back to its original position. Do this 10 times daily.

2. Finger Abduction

This exercise is similar to finger extension but involves bending the wrist while keeping it straight. Repeat this exercise 10 times daily as well.

3. Finger Adduction

Lie down on your back with your palm facing up and bring your thumb towards your wrist while keeping fingers straight at all times. Do this 10 times daily to strengthen muscles around affected joints (such as wrists).

What are the treatments for DIP Flexion Contracture?

DIP Flexion Contracture is a condition in which the joint at the base of the finger develops a contracture that makes it difficult to bend. When this happens, it can make it difficult to grip objects and perform daily tasks.

Treatment for this condition usually involves surgery. The most common treatment is arthrodesis, which is short for “arthrodesis with fusion.” During this procedure, your doctor will remove the joint at the base of your finger and fuse it together with metal plates and screws. This will prevent any further movement in that area.

Explanation of Recommended Orthotic Device

Hand

What brace is used for DIP Flexion Contracture?

For DIP Flexion Contracture, the 3pp Step Up Splint is a popular choice.

The 3pp Step Up Splint is lightweight and easy to use. It has been designed to help patients with DIP Flexion Contracture maintain their range of motion while they are healing.

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