Charcot Marie Tooth Disease

Charcot Marie Tooth Disease

VIEW DETAILS

Recommended Exercise

VIEW EXERCISE DETAILS

Orthotic Device And Benefits

VIEW DETAILS

Related Device/Equipment

Orthomed Shoulder Brace

$ 280.00

Orthomed Shoulder Brace

$ 280.00

Orthomed Shoulder Brace

$ 280.00

Orthomed Shoulder Brace

$ 280.00

VIEW ALL PRODUCTS

Charcot Marie Tooth Disease

Foot

What is Charcot-Marie Tooth Disease?

Charcot-Marie Tooth disease is an inherited disorder that affects the peripheral nervous system, which is comprised of nerves outside the brain and spinal cord.

The disorder is characterized by weakness, numbness, and muscle atrophy in the feet and legs. These symptoms typically worsen over time, resulting in difficulty walking.

Charcot-Marie Tooth disease is caused by a genetic mutation that makes it difficult for nerves to send messages back and forth from the brain to muscles. This loss of nerve function leads to changes in sensation or movement in the hands and feet.

What are the types of Charcot-Marie Tooth Disease?

There are several different types of CMT, and each type has a different cause.

Charcot-Marie Tooth (CMT) Type 1 is caused by defective genes that cause the myelin sheath to slowly break down, resulting in pain and weakness in the muscles and other symptoms associated with this disease.

Charcot-Marie Tooth (CMT) Type 2 is caused by defects in the axon, resulting in muscle weakness and wasting away of muscle tissue due to lack of nerve impulses reaching them from elsewhere in the body.

What are the causes of Charcot-Marie Tooth Disease?

Charcot-Marie Tooth Disease (CMT) is a progressive and inherited disorder that affects the peripheral nervous system. The disorder mainly affects the lower limbs, but it can also cause weakness in the feet and hands, and pain. CMT is caused by inherited faults in one of the many genes responsible for the development of the peripheral nerves.

CMT is an autosomal dominant genetic disorder, which means that if you have it, you can pass it on to your children. If one parent has CMT, there’s a 50% chance that their child will inherit it too.

What are the symptoms of Charcot-Marie Tooth Disease?

The symptoms of Charcot-Marie Tooth Disease can vary from person to person, but they generally include:

  • Sensitivity to touch and temperature
  • Loss of muscle control in your hands and feet (beyond what would be expected with normal aging)
  • Severe weakness in your legs that makes it hard to walk or stand up straight
  • Numbness in your hands or feet
  • Tingling in toes and feet
  • Numbness and coldness in hands and feet
  • Muscle weakness and loss of coordination in hands and feet
  • Muscle spasms and stiffness in hands and feet
  • Pain from nerve damage due to nerve compression (known as neuropathic pain)

What are the risk factors for Charcot-Marie Tooth Disease?

The most common risk factors are:

Age

CMT tends to develop between the ages of 20 and 40, but it can also affect children or older adults. The earlier you have symptoms, the more severe your condition may be.

Gender

Women are more likely to develop CMT than men, but whether this is due to genetics or other factors is not known for sure at this time.

Genetic factors

If you have a family history of Charcot-Marie Tooth Disease, you are at greater risk of developing it.

Environmental factors

Those who work in certain professions, or those who are exposed to certain chemicals or toxins, may be at increased risk of developing Charcot-Marie Tooth Disease.

Recommended Exercise

Foot

What are the exercises for Charcot-Marie Tooth Disease?

Severe Charcot-Marie Tooth disease often affects the patient’s ability to walk. If a patient is able to walk, it is recommended that they engage in walking, riding or rowing exercises. These exercises can help improve muscle strength and endurance.

Swimming is another exercise that can be beneficial for patients with severe Charcot-Marie Tooth disease. Swimming will help improve muscle strength and endurance while also improving balance and coordination.

Water aerobics is another form of exercise that may be beneficial for patients with severe Charcot-Marie Tooth disease. Water aerobics allows patients to exercise in a non-weight bearing environment which makes it easier on the joints of those suffering from this condition.

What are the treatments for Charcot-Marie Tooth Disease?

There is no cure for Charcot-Marie Tooth Disease. The only way to manage the disease is by managing symptoms and pain.

There are many different treatments that can help relieve the pain associated with this disease, including:

  • Pain medication (e.g., acetaminophen or ibuprofen)
  • Analgesic injections (e.g., morphine)
  • Physical therapy (e.g., massage, acupuncture)
  • Orthopedic Devices such as Braces
  • Orthopedic surgery

Explanation of Recommended Orthotic Device

Back

What brace is used for Charcot-Marie Tooth Disease?

Ankle Foot Orthoses, or AFOs, are often recommended for those with Charcot-Marie Tooth Disease. These braces are designed to support weakened ankles and feet to help prevent joint damage, muscle wastage, and other complications.

Ankle foot orthoses are used to help with the following symptoms:

  • Weakness in the ankles and feet
  • Foot deformities such as hammer toes or club foot
  • Contractures of the joints of the ankle and lower leg
  • Sensation changes in the feet

Related Device/Equipment

Orthomed Shoulder Brace

$ 280.00

Orthomed Shoulder Brace

$ 280.00

Orthomed Shoulder Brace

$ 280.00

Orthomed Shoulder Brace

$ 280.00

Request Referral

Specialist Type:

Insurance Type:

Upload Referral Document:

Share

Send by: