Anterior Cruciate Ligament Sprain

Anterior Cruciate Ligament Sprain

VIEW DETAILS

Recommended Exercise

VIEW EXERCISE DETAILS

Orthotic Device And Benefits

VIEW DETAILS

Related Device/Equipment

Orthomed Shoulder Brace

$ 280.00

Orthomed Shoulder Brace

$ 280.00

Orthomed Shoulder Brace

$ 280.00

Orthomed Shoulder Brace

$ 280.00

VIEW ALL PRODUCTS

Anterior Cruciate Ligament Sprain

Knee

What is Anterior Cruciate Ligament Sprain?

Anterior Cruciate Ligament Sprain is a common knee injury that occurs when the outside of the knee is overextended.

This can happen if you land on your foot and twist your leg at the same time, or if you twist your knee while running. The Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) is one of four ligaments in the knee that helps keep it stable. When it’s injured, it’s likely that you’ll need surgery to repair the damage and help restore normal function to your joint.

What are the types of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Sprain?

There are three types of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Sprain:

Grade I – This is a mild sprain, and the ACL may be partially torn

Grade II – This is a moderate sprain, and the ACL is partially torn

Grade III – This is a severe sprain, and the ACL is completely torn

What are the causes of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Sprain?

There are many causes of ACL injury, including:

  • A direct blow to the knee
  • Twisting your knee while running or jumping
  • Landing awkwardly after a jump or fall
  • Torn cartilage or meniscus in the knee joint

What are the symptoms of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Sprain?

Anterior Cruciate Ligament Sprain is a serious injury that can cause swelling, pain and instability in the knee.

The symptoms of Anterior Cruciate Ligament Sprain include:

  • Pain in the anterior (front) of the knee
  • Sudden onset of pain in the knee
  • Instability of the knee joint
  • Swelling around the knee joint
  • A popping sensation at the time of injury

What are the risk factors for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Sprain?

Anterior Cruciate Ligament Sprain is a common injury that can happen to anyone. There are many risk factors for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Sprain, including:

  • Being overweight or obese
  • Having a family history of ACL injury
  • Playing sports such as basketball, football, soccer, volleyball or tennis
  • Having an injury to the other knee or ankle
  • Not warming up before exercise

Recommended Exercise

Knee

What are the treatments for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Sprain?

Treatment for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Sprain depends on several factors, including the severity of your injury and the type of treatment you choose to pursue. The most common types of treatment are physical therapy, surgery and bracing.

Physical therapy

Physical therapy is a good choice if you have a minor sprain that has not resulted in any significant ligament damage and is not affecting your ability to perform daily activities.

The goal of physical therapy is to strengthen and protect your knee by improving mobility and balance.

Medications

You may also be prescribed anti-inflammatory medications or ice packs to help with swelling and pain relief.

Surgery

Surgery may be recommended if you have severe damage to your anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), which could include:

Ruptured ACL

A complete tear in the ACL means it’s completely torn apart; this type of injury requires surgery because there’s no way for it to heal without surgical repair.

What are the exercises forĀ  Anterior Cruciate Ligament Sprain?

If you’ve injured your anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), it’s important to know that there are exercises that can help strengthen the muscles around your knee, reduce swelling and inflammation, and improve range of motion.

The following exercises are particularly good for strengthening the muscles around your knee:

Quad sets

Stand with your feet shoulder-width apart and your arms by your side. Contract the muscles in your thighs so that you can raise one foot off of the ground, then return it to the floor. Repeat this movement 10 times, then switch legs and repeat.

Straight-leg raises

Lie down on your back with your legs straight out in front of you. Raise one leg up until it is parallel to the floor, then return it to the surface. Repeat this movement 10 times, then switch legs and repeat.

Heel slides

Stand up with your feet hip-width apart and knees slightly bent. Slide one foot forward while keeping the other stationary at first, then slide both feet forward together so that they meet in front of you before sliding them back again (so that they are now behind). Do this for about 30 seconds per set.

Explanation of Recommended Orthotic Device

Knee

What brace is used for Anterior Cruciate Ligament Sprain?

Hinged knee braces can help you move around more easily while protecting your ACL repair site and helping your knee heal properly. They also give you added protection against re-injury once you’ve healed, which means they’re an absolute must for anyone who wants to get back in shape after an ACL tear or rupture.

Related Device/Equipment

Orthomed Shoulder Brace

$ 280.00

Orthomed Shoulder Brace

$ 280.00

Orthomed Shoulder Brace

$ 280.00

Orthomed Shoulder Brace

$ 280.00

Request Referral

Specialist Type:

Insurance Type:

Upload Referral Document:

Share

Send by: