Ankle Laxity

Ankle Laxity

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Ankle Laxity

Foot

What is Ankle Laxity?

Ankle laxity is a condition that causes the joints in your ankle to become loose and unstable. As a result, your ankle can move too much when you walk or run, which can lead to injuries like sprains and tendonitis.

It’s common for people with ankle laxity to experience pain or discomfort when they try to run or walk. They may also feel like their foot rolls inwards as they take a step forward, even if they’re walking straight.

Ankle laxity is most often caused by wearing high heels or shoes with narrow heels and pointed toes. It can also be linked to having flat feet or low arches in your feet—these are both common conditions that affect many people and are often inherited from parents who had them as well.

What are the types of Ankle Laxity?

There are two main types of ankle laxity: chronic and acute.

Chronic Ankle Laxity

Chronic ankle laxity is a condition that occurs when the ligaments in your ankle are loose, causing them to stretch out. Over time, this can lead to pain and instability in your ankle. Chronic ankle laxity can occur when you have flat feet or overpronate (meaning your foot rolls inward).

Acute Ankle Laxity

Acute ankle laxity is a sudden and extreme stretching of the ligaments in your ankle. This can cause pain and swelling in the joint, as well as making it difficult to walk on uneven ground or stairs. Acute ankle laxity is often caused by an injury or sudden movement of your foot.

What are the causes of Ankle Laxity?

Ankle laxity is a condition that causes the ankle to be unstable. This can lead to an increased risk of spraining your ankle, as well as other issues like Achilles tendonitis.

There are several factors that can contribute to ankle laxity:

Genetics

Some people are born with a tendency towards having loose joints and ligaments, which can make them more susceptible to ankle laxity.

Wear and tear

If you have been participating in activities that put strain on your ankles for a long period of time (such as running), it can cause them to become loose over time as well.

Footwear

Wearing shoes that don’t fit properly or are too small can also contribute to ankle laxity, because they will cause your foot muscles over time become weak and unable to provide adequate support for the joint itself.

What are the symptoms of Ankle Laxity?

The symptoms of ankle laxity include:

  • Pain, especially when running or jumping
  • A feeling that the ankle is unstable or loose
  • Limping or walking with a limp
  • A limp or a roll of the foot when walking
  • An inability to stand on the tip of your toes
  • A tendency to roll your ankles easily

What are the risk factors for Ankle Laxity?

There are many risk factors for ankle laxity. The most common risk factors include:

  • Age: Ankle laxity is more common in middle-aged and elderly people.
  • Gender: Women are more likely than men to have ankle laxity.
  • Bone structure: People with wider feet tend to develop ankle laxity more often than those with narrow feet.
  • Activity level: People who run or do other high impact activities on hard surfaces are more likely than others to develop ankle laxity

Recommended Exercise

Foot

What are the exercises for Ankle Laxity?

There are several exercises you can do to help your ankles feel more stable.

Resisted ankle inversion

This is an exercise that helps strengthen the muscles on the outside of your ankles and improve the strength of your ankle ligaments.

You’ll need a strap that’s long enough to go around both ankles and a resistance band. Wrap the resistance band around one foot and then step on the other end of it with your other foot, so that it’s pulled tight.

Put your hands against a wall for support and slowly roll your foot outwards, at about forty-five degrees.

Do this for about five seconds before returning to neutral.

Repeat ten times per leg, three times per day.

Ankle range of motion

Another helpful exercise is ankle range of motion.

Stand on one foot with your knee bent at ninety degrees.

Slowly lower yourself down towards the ground until you feel a stretch in your calf muscle and then return back up again using only your toes to push off against the floor as much as possible each time (rather than using any heel).

Do this ten times per leg, three times per day.

What are the treatments for Ankle Laxity?

Treatment options for ankle laxity include:

Medications (anti-inflammatories)

These can help reduce swelling and inflammation, which may decrease pain and improve healing time.

Physical therapy

This may be used to strengthen the muscles around your ankle joint and improve its range of motion.

Braces

A brace can help stabilize your foot and ankle, reducing pain and increasing mobility.

Explanation of Recommended Orthotic Device

Back

What brace is used for Ankle Laxity?

Ankle orthoses are used for ankle laxity.

Ankle laxity is a condition in which the ankle joint is loose and unstable, causing it to move too much in either direction. Ankle laxity can lead to other injuries, such as sprains and even fractures.

Ankle orthoses are devices that help stabilize your ankle and reduce the amount of movement in your ankle joint. These devices are commonly made of plastic or metal as well as cloth or foam padding that fit around your foot and lower leg.

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