Ankle Instability

Ankle Instability

VIEW DETAILS

Recommended Exercise

VIEW EXERCISE DETAILS

Orthotic Device And Benefits

VIEW DETAILS

Related Device/Equipment

Orthomed Shoulder Brace

$ 280.00

Orthomed Shoulder Brace

$ 280.00

Orthomed Shoulder Brace

$ 280.00

Orthomed Shoulder Brace

$ 280.00

VIEW ALL PRODUCTS

Ankle Instability

Foot

What is Ankle Instability?

Ankle instability occurs when the ligaments that hold your ankle together are loose, causing your ankle to move around unnecessarily. This can cause pain and discomfort as well as an inability to walk normally.

The ankle joint is made up of three bones: the tibia (shin bone), fibula (smaller bone in front of the tibia), and talus (a large bone at the back of your ankle). The bones are held together by ligaments that connect them to each other and help support the weight of your body.

Your joints have special cushioning pads called cartilage that help absorb shock as you move around, but when you have unstable ankles, these pads can wear away, making them prone to injury.

What are the types of Ankle Instability?

Ankle instability is a condition that affects the ankle joint and surrounding ligaments. There are two types of ankle instability: anterior and posterior.

Anterior ankle instability occurs when the ligaments on the front (anterior) part of your ankle are torn or stretched. These ligaments prevent your foot from moving too far forward in relation to your leg. Anterior ankle instability can be caused by trauma, such as an injury that results in a tear in one of these ligaments, or it can happen gradually over time with repetitive stress on the joint.

Posterior ankle instability occurs when there is damage to the ligaments on the back (posterior) part of your ankle. Posterior ankle instability is rarer than anterior instability, but it can also occur gradually with repetitive stress on the joint or after a sudden injury such as a fracture or dislocation.

What are the causes of Ankle Instability?

The most common causes of ankle instability include:

  • Injury to the ligaments or tendons surrounding the ankle
  • An abnormal shape of your foot’s arch or heels (flat feet)
  • Leg length discrepancy (difference between your left and right leg)
  • Other conditions that can lead to an unstable ankle include:
  • Arthritis – Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative condition characterized by pain and stiffness in joints, especially those at higher risk for wear such as hips, knees and ankles. OA often affects multiple joints simultaneously leading to increased pain and decreased mobility over time.
  • Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune condition where your body attacks its own tissues causing inflammation resulting in pain and swelling of joints throughout your body including your ankles!

What are the symptoms of Ankle Instability?

Ankle Instability is characterized by ankle pain and instability. Patients with Ankle Instability often complain of pain, swelling, and discomfort in their ankles. Pain is usually worse with activity and improves with rest. Instability is a frequent complaint, but this may be due to pain rather than true instability.

The symptoms of ankle instability include:

  • Pain around the ankle joint
  • Swelling around the ankle joint
  • Feeling like your ankle can’t bear weight or that it rolls in or out when you walk
  • Tenderness when pressing on the outside of your foot below your ankle bone

What are the risk factors for Ankle Instability?

The risk factors for ankle instability include:

  • An injury to your ankle (like a sprain)
  • Excessive activity or exercise without proper rest
  • A previous injury to your ankle
  • An abnormal bone structure in your foot or leg
  • Previous injury or trauma to the ankle
  • A congenital condition that affects the growth or development of your ankle
  • Being overweight or obese

Recommended Exercise

Foot

What are the exercises for Ankle Instability?

There are several exercises you can do to strengthen your ankles and improve their stability. Here are a few examples:

Foam Rolling the Calves (Calf Stretch)

A simple stretch you can do to loosen your calves is the foam rolling calf stretch. Place a foam roller on the floor, and then put your foot on top of it. Roll your weight over to one side until you feel a stretch in your calf muscle. Hold this position for 30 seconds, then switch sides and repeat. You should feel tension release from the muscles in your lower leg as you roll back and forth.

Ankle Circles

Ankle circles are another great way to target the muscles around your ankles and feet by using them as part of a larger exercise routine. For example, when you’re doing squats or lunges, try holding onto something stable like a wall or chair for balance as you move your feet in circles around each other at first before working up to larger circles that extend further away from each other as well as up higher off the ground.

What are the treatments for Ankle Instability?

The primary treatment for ankle instability is physical therapy, which can help you regain strength and stability in your ankle joint.

Physical therapy for ankle instability focuses on strengthening the muscles around your ankle to prevent further injury. Your therapist may also use massage therapy to relax your muscles, as well as stretching exercises to help you regain motion in your ankle joint.

If you have severe ankle instability, surgery may be recommended to repair any damage done to the ligaments or tendons surrounding your ankle joint. Surgery can help decrease pain and swelling caused by chronic injuries, but it will not necessarily improve range of motion.

Explanation of Recommended Orthotic Device

Back

What brace is used for Ankle Instability?

The ankle brace is used for ankle instability. Ankle instability is a condition in which the ankle joint is not stable, causing it to loosen and become unstable. This can be caused by an injury or may be present from birth.

Related Device/Equipment

Orthomed Shoulder Brace

$ 280.00

Orthomed Shoulder Brace

$ 280.00

Orthomed Shoulder Brace

$ 280.00

Orthomed Shoulder Brace

$ 280.00

Request Referral

Specialist Type:

Insurance Type:

Upload Referral Document:

Share

Send by: